Skip to main content

Full text of "Book and news-dealer"

See other formats


6 

ft 



F 

8S0 
BS7 




BANCROFT 
LIBRARY 



THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 



S'i-*?"'.!''!'^'!; ;-,'*»-if i.&fijtUi.y*.. .». I 



VOL. II. NO. 18. 



A Semi-Monthly Magazine of practical service to every dealer p 
in Books, Periodicals and Stationery. ^ 



t 



HEWSDEALER 



la 



*^ ft 






APRIL 1, 1801. li 

a IS 

i 



HOW TO SELL GOODS, ^93 » f 

THE NEWSMAN OF TREMLEY POINT {Charles Barker Bradford in the t S 

Journalist), 197 > d 

SOMETHING ABOUT " SCRIBNER'S "—A QUERY ANSWERED— NEW g 5 

BASEBALL GUIDE, I99 ^ S 

MORE ABOUT "ONCE A WEEK," 200 J S* 

RECENT BOOKS REVIEWED— THE NEW POEM, . . . . . 202 ^V 

THE OPEN COURT, 205 5 « 

THE BEST NEW BOOKS TO SELL, 207 1 1 

EGO NOTES, 208 ^ ^ I 

♦'ILLUSTRATED AMERICAN"— ANOTHER MAGAZINE COMING, . 209 1^5*2 

PUBLICATION DAY TABLE, 210 ^"^ 5 

THE LATEST BOOKS, 211 § » 

PRICE-LIST NOTES, 213 gl 2 

WHOLESALE PRICE AND RETURNABLE LIST OF PERIODICALS g £ £ 

COMMONLY HANDLED BY NEWSDEALERS, . . . . 217 ft. J ;§ 

.-:; UNPROMISING FIELD FOR CANVASSERS— BOOKS RECEIVED, 223 ^"^ "5 

THE ENGLISH EDITION IS " THE SEASON "—NEW SIMILE, . 224 3 S 

j t £ 

i > 2. 



18 NEWSDEALER has a larger legitimate circulation ? ^ 
than any other Journal of the Trade. -3 



One Copy, lO Cents One Year $2.00. s 



The Ladies' Home Joaml 



HAS A CIRCULATION OF 

Six Htindred Th.ou.sand 

Copies ! 

Each issue, and Is always filled with original 
matter by the most eminent writers of the world. 
It is profusely illustrated by the most noted 
artists, and is by far the handsomest publication 
ever issued for ladies and the family. 

Newsdealers serve it regularly to perma- 
iie7it patrons at Teii Cents a copy. Work tip 

a route, 

1?^. 



^av 



Large Profit. No Risk. Returnable. 

% 

Pa.rticu.la.rs at San Krancisco Office, 
IRoonrx 8O9 Olxroriiclo Bxilldinjic. 

>S- ! 

CUI^TIS fUBLISHIJMQ COMfAJ^JY. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



I 



THE 






NEWSDEALER 



Vol.. II. 



APRIIv I, 1891. 



No. 18. 



HOW TO SEI,^, GOODS. 



At a Territorial Fair held in Salt 
Lake City prizes were given for the 
best essaj^s on various business sub- 
jects. One of these prizes was for 
the best essay on ' ' How to Sell 
Goods." It was won by B. F. 
Cummings, Jr. His essay is as fol- 
lows : 

A moment's reflection will serve 
to show the infinite importance of 
this subject. It not only concerns 
the salesman and merchant, but 
every member of civilized society ; 
for, as all members of civilized 
communities are compelled to pur- 
chase and consume merchandise, it 
follows that all are interested in the 
manner in which the merchandise 
they buy is sold. 

Methods of selling goods may be 
pursued which are hurtful to the in- 
terests of merchant and customer 
alike, and which result in disap- 
pointment and injur>' to the latter, 
and a loss of custom and final fail- 
ure to the former. Or the merchant 
may pursue a system which, while 
yielding an excellent profit to him- 
self, will please, gratify and benefit 
his customers, make them feel that 
they can do better with him than 
elsewhere, and so secure their per- 
manent patronage. How to avoid 
the results of one method, and se- 
cure those of the other, is comprised 
in the art of selling goods. 

The process of selling goods is in- 
timately connected, indeed begins 
with that of buying them ; for, as 
the proverb has it, " Goods well 
bought are half sold." He, then. 



who would become a successful 
seller of goods must first learn how 
to buy them ; and it is an open 
question among merchants which 
branch of their calling, buying or 
selling, requires the longer experi- 
ence, the shrewder judgment and 
the higher order of business ability. 
As the present purpose, however, is 
to treat of the methods to be pur- 
sued in selling goods, it will be as- 
sumed that the stock to be disposed 
of has been well bought, is suited to 
the wants of the community, and 
only awaits skillful and judicious 
handling by the salesman to yield 
satisfactory returns to the merchant. 

MARKING THE GOODS. 

One of the most important mat- 
ters connected with the mercantile 
business is the marking of goods. 
In doing this three objects should 
be kept in view : Profit to the 
merchant, ready sale, and satisfac- 
tion to the customer. This last ob- 
ject is often lost sight of, but we in- 
sist that a policy on the part of the 
salesman who does not aim at se- 
curing satisfaction to the customer 
is a short-sighted one, and will 
ultimately prove disastrous to the 
dealer. A customer will pay for a 
suit of clothes a price which will 
yield to the merchant a fair profit, 
and yet be content with his bargain ; 
but were a sack of sugar marked to 
yield half as large a profit, a cus- 
tomer would feel that an attempt 
had been made to impose upon him. 
On some kinds of goods, then, cus- 
tomers will willingly allow the 
merchants a good profit, and others 



194 



The Newsdealer. 



they will purchase only at a very 
small margin above cost. 

It is the duty of the salesman to 
consider all the circumstances at- 
tendant upon this feature of his 
business, as the amount the capital 
invested ought to earn, the probable 
amount of the year's sales, the run- 
ning expenses of the establishment, 
kinds of goods handled, the com- 
petition to be met, the class of trade 
to be catered to, what will and will 
not satisfy his customers, etc. A 
volume could be written upon 
this one feature of mercantile busi- 
ness, but practical experience and 
native good judgment are the only 
means by which a salesman can be- 
come proficient in it. 

Having considered every circum- 
stance which ought to influence 
him in marking the goods, the 
salesman should make his prices 
and then adhere to them. A rumor 
that a house has two or more prices, 
according to the customer who is 
buying, will spread rapidly, and 
soon create a distrust very hurtful 
to its business. It is unfair, un- 
dignified and downright dishonesty 
to make different prices to different 
customers, other things being equal, 
such as quantity, time, etc. Uni- 
form dealing one-price houses com- 
mand a respect and confidence 
among customers which sliding 
scale dealers never enjoy. 

Careful investigation has shown 
that in nearly all cases of bankrupt 
retail dealers, a large proportion of 
the goods on their shelves were un- 
marked, and hence in a condition 
of confusion which could not but 
result in loss and disaster. The re- 
tail dealer who puts his goods on 
the shelves without marking them 
is tolerably certain to learn by bit- 
ter experience sooner or later the 
folly of his course ; and the whole- 
sale dealer who fails to keep a suit- 
able record of prices as the market 
fluctuates is omitting a vital feature 
of success. 

THE WHOLESAIyE SALESMAN. 

Whether employed in the estab- 



lishment at home, or sent " out on 
the road ' ' in the capacity of what 
is called a drummer, the first duty 
of the wholesale salesman is to make 
himself thoroughly and perfectly 
familiar with the entire stock of 
goods in the department or house 
in which he is employed. If an 
article is mentioned, he should be 
able to state instantly whether or 
not it is in stock. It is of the ut- 
most importance that he should be 
thoroughly posted on prices, and 
able to give from memory or his 
pocket price-book the price of any 
article the instant it is asked. He 
should be able to discriminate ac- 
curately between brands, grades, 
qualities, etc., and explain differ- 
ences between them to a customer. 

Next to having a thorough 
knowledge of his own stock and 
business, it is important that the 
wholesale salesman should be 
familiar with those of his customer. 
He should know what kind of busi- 
ness his customer is doing, what 
class of people patronize him, and 
what goods will be most popular 
and best suited to the needs of that 
class. A wholesale salesman should 
not try to load up a retail dealer 
with goods not suited to the latter' s 
trade. If this is done, the retailer 
will meet with disappointment and 
loss, and in consequence of dead 
stock will be unable to meet his 
payments. Disgust at his own bad 
judgment will be mingled with dis- 
trust of the salesman who induced 
him to take the unsalable goods, 
and he will thereafter buy else- 
where. Thus the retailer is in- 
jured and the wholesaler loses a 
good customer. All this may hap- 
pen when the goods causing the 
trouble are really first-class and 
sold at a reasonable price, the 
difficulty lying in the fact that the 
wholesale salesman either did not 
know or did not regard what the 
real interests of his customer re- 
quired. 

All wholesale salesmen of experi- 
ence understand perfectly well that, 
having once won the confidence and 



The NEWSDEAI.ER. 



195 



patronage of a retail dealer, he is in- 
fluenced to a great extent by their 
advice and recommendations. It 
follows, then, that these should be 
offered intelligently and in the 
strictest good faith, with an earnest 
purpose on the part of the salesman 
to subserve the best interests of his 
customer. Their interests are 
identical. The more goods the re- 
tailer sells, the more he will pur- 
chase from the wholesale house 
which has won his confidence. A 
bill of goods which is unprofitable 
for him to buy is unprofitable 
for the wholesale house to sell to 
him, and vice versa. In fact, a 
trunk and branch relationship exists 
between a wholesale house and the 
retailers whom it supplies, and the 
policy of the wholesale salesman 
should be to cement more and more 
closely that relationship, and 
strengthen the ties of confidence 
and friendship between the two, 
always having in view the interests 
of the buyer as well as those of his 
own house. 

It is essential that the wholesale 
salesman should be thoroughly 
posted respecting the financial 
standing of his customer. Upon 
this point depends to a great extent 
his success in the art of selling 
goods. It requires little tact or 
ability to sell goods to a customer 
who is bent only on getting all he 
can on credit, without due con- 
sideration of the matter of making 
payment when due. It may, how- 
ever, require considerable tact to 
properly treat a customer whose in- 
tentions are honorable, but whose 
resources, ability or experience are 
limited. If a buyer is known or 
suspected to be dishonest, sell to 
him for cash only. If necessary, 
tell him frankly that you do not 
know him to be a man whom you 
can afford to carry, and that your 
rule is to extend credit to those only 
whom you can depend upon. If 
your customer is worthy of credit 
up to a limit which, however, you 
do not wish to pass, avoid what, to 
a good salesman, is second nature, 



pushing goods upon him. En- 
deavor to furnish him with what he 
really needs, and to satisfy him, 
without going beyond the limit 
fixed for his credit. But should it 
be necessary, tell him plainly, but 
in a frank and friendly way, that at 
present you do not wish to carry 
him for more than a given amount. 
If he is a sensible man, he will take 
no offense, and if he is not a sen- 
sible man, it is unsafe for you to 
carry him on your books. 

Selling goods by traveling sales- 
men with samples is expensive, but 
long experience has shown it to be 
the best method for wholesale 
dealers in many lines. The sample 
trunk, if properly prepared and 
packed, is the wholesale establish- 
ment in miniature. By its aid the 
country dealer is conducted through 
the big store in the city, from the 
basement to the highest story, and 
is able to make selections as intelli- 
gently as if he had paid his fare to 
the city and was personally present 
in the establishment he is dealing 
with. The salesman should see 
that his sample trunk is complete, 
neatly and systematically arranged, 
and that samples correctly represent 
the stock. He should acquire 
facility in displaying them, in describ- 
ing grades, qualities, etc., and in 
giving prices. The stationary or 
traveling wholesale salesman should 
keep complete price books, and post 
them as often as the prices vary. 
The memory should not be de- 
pended upon without their aid. 

THE RETAII, SAI^BSMAN. 

Much of the foregoing applies to 
the retail salesman, especially in re- 
gard to familiarity with stock and 
prices and the giving of credit. He 
should be perfectly familiar with 
the goods he handles and with the 
prices at which they should be sold. 
If his employer deems it best to 
give him the " cost mark," as will 
generally be the case if he proves a 
good hand, so much the better. He 
should know exactly where to find 
any article called for. Time is 



196 



The NewsdeaivKr. 



money to buyer and seller alike, 
and the time lost by both while 
a clerk is hunting for some article 
for which a customer is waiting 
often amounts to a heavy percentage 
of its value. It is thus necessary 
for a retail clerk to be orderly and 
methodical to a strict degree in 
handling his stock. He must at 
once return to their places on 
shelves or in drawers, etc., the 
goods he has been showing a cus- 
tomer, and he must do this in such 
a manner as to preserve the stock in 
perfect order. A failure to keep 
the stock in order and the goods in 
their places and neatly arranged is 
possibly the most common fault of 
the retail salesman. To avoid it he 
must put in the spare moments be- 
tween customers in arranging 
shelves, drawers, showcases, etc., 
and in so displaying the goods as 
to cause them to appear new, fresh, 
varied and attractive. A retail 
salesman who can and will keep the 
goods arranged and displayed to 
the best advantage will command a 
high salary and will be a favorite 
with customers. 

A very important auxiliary to 
the success of the retail salesman is 
the keeping up of his stock so as to 
avoid being out of any article. 
Vigilance and good judgment are 
required in ordering various lines 
as fast as they will be needed, but 
not fast enough to overstock. 

The retail salesman, to be suc- 
cessful, must learn to read human 
nature. He must be able to per- 
ceive quickly the sort of person he 
is dealing with, and to form an ac- 
curate judgment as to what sort of 
an article, and about what price 
will be likely to suit the customer. 
Scarcely one customer in ten who 
enters a store to purchase an article 
knows in advance exactly what he 
wants ; and it is the province of the 
clerk to aid him in coming to a 
conclusion. The art of doing this 
may be acquired to a great degree 
of perfection, though not without 
long practice and experience ; and, 
when acquired, it adds immensely 



to the value of the services of the 
salesman possessing it. 

QUALITIES NECESSARY IN ALI, 
SAI^ESMEN. 

Be industrious ; exert yourselves 
actively to show goods to customers 
and to find what will suit them. 

Be patient ; preserve perfect 
equanimity, even though your cus- 
tomer appears trifling, fastidious or 
exacting. Sincere efforts on your 
part to please him will win in the 
long run. 

Be polite ; under no circum- 
stances speak to or treat a customer 
with impoliteness. To do so is to 
make a mistake inexcusable in a 
salesman. Your politeness to cus- 
tomers is money to your employer, 
and is one of the considerations for 
which you are paid a salary. 

Be considerate of poverty ; do not 
try to sell a poor person a more ex- 
pensive article than he can afford to 
buy. By so doing you may wound 
his feelings, and cause him to avoid 
you in future. Rather try to suit 
him with an article within his 
means. If you succeed he will try 
you again. 

Be attentive to small purchasers ; 
if a lady wishes only a spool of silk, 
and you politely furnish her with 
the shade desired, she will come to 
you when she has a larger purchase 
to make. 

Be truthful ; never resort to de- 
ception in representing the quality 
of the goods you sell. Truthful- 
ness is in a salesman a virtue 
which will soon begin to tell in a 
pecuniary as well as a moral way, 
for people will flock to the clerk 
whose word they know they can 
depend upon respecting the value 
they are getting for their money. 

Be honest ; not merely because 
honesty is the best policy, but be- 
cause without it life is a failure, 
though wealth flow in to the 
amount of millions, and the world 
lavish its honor and applause. The 
most hopeless and contemptible of 
bankrupts is the man who has lost 
his honesty ; and the most useless 



The NEWSDEAI.ER. 



197 



to all employers — the one who is 
most expensive while least worthy of 
a salary, who is most to be avoided 
by customers and abhorred by mer- 
chants — is the dishonest salesman. 



XHE: NB"WSI»IAI« ok TIl.EMI,EY 
POIIST. 



Tremley Point is the name of a 
little spot in Jersey where trains 
are obliged to come to a halt before 
crossing a river bridge. There are 
altogether six dwellings at Trem- 
ley Point, four being farm houses, 
one a saloon, and another the lowly 
abode of the man who acts as 
station master, postman, telegraph 
operator, switchman, flagman and 
newsdealer. 

Tremley Point being a favorite 
bay snipe locality of mine, I soon 
became companionable with the in- 
habitants — a very wise accomplish- 
ment for a man who knows the bit- 
ing qualities of Jersey dogs — and 
entertained particular affection for 
' ' the principal office holder of the 
country," the gentleman who 
flagged the trains, ticked the wires, 
handled the mail, switched the 
cars and tried to sell the news- 
papers. He was an interesting per- 
son, and I used to find great amuse- 
ment chatting with him while wait- 
ing for the train. One day, as I 
was changing my rubber boots for a 
pair of city shoes he used to care 
for during my shooting time, I 
noticed that he was unusually busy 
in the periodical department of his 
establishment — a pine-board shanty 
no larger than an ordinary mail 
wagon. 

' ' You're hurrying to-day, ' ' said I. 
"Yep, got ter get these yere 
papers and maggiezeenes ofi" on the 
five train," he replied. 

"Why, you get all the dailies, 
the weeklies and the monthlies — 
everything published that amounts 
to anything, don't you?" said I. 
" Everything from the penny paper 
. to the half-dollar magazine ? ' ' 

"Yep, get 'em all — Harpers' s, 
Plecce Guzett, /edge, Puck^ Jour?i'list, 



Life, Home Journal, et cetta, et 
cetta, et cetta ; duni big heap on 
'em to get ready fer the five, I tell 
yer. ' ' 

And truly the man had his little 
counter and show-case filled with 
copies of every one of the leading 
publications of the day, the heaviest, 
the brightest and the funniest, 
papers devoted to politics, trade 
papers, religious papers, fashion 
papers, and papers and magazines 
of all sorts and colors. 

' ' Have much sale for them ? " I 
asked. 

" Nope, only one, the Haome 
Journal there ; send thet to Miss 
Disosway ; takes it every week, be- 
gosh ! " 

" Don't sell any of the others, eh ; 
hardly pays to handle them in a 
place like this, I suppose ? ' ' 

"Wall, I don't mind it nauw ; 
wife, she reads 'em all over, and 
my boy, Palm, he kinder hankers 
arter the picktures, while dad, he 
has lots time jes nauw, and seems 
to enjoy hiself with several. Yo' 
see, don' corst enythin' for 'em, 
outside the time to undo and tie 
'em up agin, and I s'pose I might 
jes as well have 'em come as not. 
Couldn't sell papers here anyway ; 
people as kin read is all firin' 
stingy ; them as kant ain't got no 
■ money. Thar comes the five now, 
begosh ! ' ' 

And my friend hurried out of the 
place with one of a half-dozen bun- 
dles he had tied up. As I bid him 
good-bye, ' ' Palm ' ' came in and 
said : 

" Par, mar wants the Yankey 
Blade, the Neversink Times, and 
the Christmas Wide Awake." — 
Charles Barker Bradford in The 
Journalist. 

1 ^ > 

"The Servant of Satan," 
— Prado — having had its day, has 
been dropped from the Sea and 
Shore Series, of which it was num- 
ber seven, and " RuyBlas," founded 
on the drama of that name, by 
Victor Hugo, has been issued in its 
stead. 



198 The; NewsdeaIvER. 

NILE PUBLISHING COMPANY'S 

NEW BOOKS 

Discount on our 25-cent Series Is jQfo, anJ on our SO-cent Series is 40fc 

BEI^ AMI. 

By GUY U B Tvl A U P A S S A.N T. 

A powerful, realistic novel, translated from the 40lh French Edition. This is a complete and hand- 
some volume. Paper cover^ dO Dents. 

The Woman of Kire. 

By ADOLPHK BELOT. Translated from the 60th French Edition. Paper Cover, 50 cts. 

This volume is illustrated with sixteen half-tones from designs bv eminent artists. Great care 
has been exercised in the preparation of the book, to make it beautiful and attractive. 
This is the most interesting work of this popular modern French author. . 

A BEAUTIFUL PAPER^ EDITION OF THE 

Heptameron of Margaret, Queen § Navarre 

The subjects of the tales do not differ much from those of Boccaccio, though they are, as a rule 
occupied with a higher class of society, and oi necessity display a more polished condition of man- 
ners. The best of them arc animated'by the same spirit of refined voluptuousness which animates so 
much of the writing and art of the time, and wnich may indeed be said to be its chief feature. 
But this spirit has seldom been presented in a light so attractive as that which it bears in the 
Heptameron. — Saintsbury's Iligtory of French Literature. 
Paper Cover, 50 cts.; Cloth, %t.2b. 10,000 Copies of this Booit already sold. 



A COMPLETE PAPER EDITION OF 

DROLL STORIKS. 

By honors DE BALZAC. 

One of the greatest French novelists and the most successful expounder of human nature. This 
edition contains 464 pages and is illustrated with a number of designs by 

GUSTAVE DOR]&. 

Paper Cover, 50 cts.; Cloth, Sl.OO. 2O,000 Copies of this Book already sold. 

:ivr o ]^ E> 1^. 



ZOL.AfS NEW^ NOVEL. By EITIII.E ZOL.A. 

One Volume, 12mo paper cover, with design in two colors, 25 cts. " Money " is the last of the Rou- 
gon-Macquarc series, of which the " Fortune of the Rougons " is the first. To obtain a complete under- 
standing of the former it is necessary to read the latter. For this reason we have brought out a hand- 
some edition of 

THE FORTUNE OF THE ROUGONS. 

^ By EmiLE ZOI.A. 

One Volume, 12mo, paper cover, with design in two colors, 25 cents. The two foregoing books will 
be issued in our usual handsome style They will have the attractions of good paper, large, clear print 
and beautiful covers. No bookseller can afford to be without these books, which will undoubtedly be 
among the most popular novels of the year. They are mailable at one cent a pounc*. 

EyTHEOPHILE GAUTIER, Author of "Mademoiselle de Maupin," "Captain Fracasse," " Spirite." 
The Most Charming Book, by one of the Greatest French Authors. 
" Gautier is an inimitoble model. His manner is so light and true, so really creative, his fancy so 
alert, his taste so happy, his humor so genial, that he makes illusion almost as contagious as laughter." 
—Mr. Henry James. Paper Cover, 25 cents. 

By P. J. DUFF. 

A realistic novel, embracing mirth, wit and wisdom. Paper Cover, 25 cents. 

All of the 25-cent books mailable at one cent a pound. Order of your jobber or direct from Publishers. 

NILE PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

3 4:0 XSea.i^'loox'xx Street, CJIxIcciso. 



The Newsdealer. 



199 



SODIKXHIPIG ABOUT 



SCRIB- 



If publishers can be brought to 
understand that newsdealers every- 
where are watching them closely, 
they will be less ready to fall in 
with schemes of other publishers to 
get a few subscribers by offering 
their periodicals way below regular 
rates. The ' ' club rate ' ' referred 
to in Mr. Weiser's letter, printed 
below, is out of all proportion when 
compared with the regular rates of 
the publications in question. A 
dealer wishing to subscribe for the 
two would have to pay $3.45 — $2.60 
for Scribjier's and $.85 for the Inter- 
Ocean — yet to the general public a 
rate of $2.90 was made, and the 
dealer, for the time at least, was 
quite forgotten. Scribner' s could 
not legitimately exist without the 
universal assistance of the trade, 
and it does not speak well for the 
publishers' appreciation of the 
newsdealers' successful efforts in 
their behalf, that they descend to 
such petty business as is revealed 
in their Inter-Ocean combination, 
on which the following letter from a 
valued supporter of The News- 
dealer sheds a new and intelli- 
gent light : 
*'Fairbury, Neb., Feb. 26, '91. 

" Inclosed find an advertisement 
that I cut out of a copy of the 
Chicago Inter-Ocean, which was 
brought in to me about the first of 
January. This paper states that 
they will send the Inter-Ocean and 
Scribner' s Magazine for 1891, to 
any one in the United States or 
Canada, for $2.90. The publishers' 
price of the Inter-Ocean is $1.00 a 
year, and Scribner' s is $3.00 a 
year. Now, I should think that 
Charles Scribner' s Sons would rate 
their magazine above any such 
combination as this. 

' ' Give them a raking over in next 
issue of The Newsdealer. I 
have got The Newsdealer 
through the Omaha News Com- 
pany since number thirteen, and 
would not be without it now. It is 



a crimper from the word go, and 
let the good work go on, and in the 
future I think that the newsdealers 
of the United States will be able to 
ascertain what a little paper out in 
California has done for them. Give 
Scribner' s and the Inter-Ocean a. 
jacking up. I am, 

' ' Yours truly, 
" George W. Weiser." 



A QUERY AJMS^VVERED. 



Recently a St. James, Minnesota, 
reader wrote the Newsdealer, 
saying : "I have had some com- 
plaints in regard to selling the 
Police Gazette on news-stands. Will 
you please mention in your next 
issue whether there is a law against 
selling the Police Gazette or not ? ' ' 
Not feeling quite certain on the 
subject, the inquiry was referred to 
the publisher of the ^aper in ques- 
tion, with the foUowmg result : 
" New York, Feb. 26, 1891. 

" In reply to your favor of the 
14th instant, regarding inquiry of A. 
J. Knorr, will say that there is no 
State in the Union in which there 
exists a law prohibiting the sale of 
Police Gazette. Every State has a 
statute prohibiting the sale of ob- 
scene literature and papers made 
up of deeds of crime and blood, 
which the Police Gazette does not 
come under, as the paper is devoted 
to theatrical, sporting and sensa- 
tional news only. 

' ' Yours very truly, 

" Richard K. Fox." 



NEW BASEBAI^l, OUIDE. 



The trade will be glad to learn 
that the publishers of the Sporting 
Life have commenced the publica- 
tion of an annual official Baseball 
Guide. The issue for 1891 is 
nearly ready, and, as it will be re- 
turnable, will no doubt meet with 
a cordial reception — to the detri- 
ment of the other guides which, 
having had things all their own 
way so long, have grown too inde- 
pendent. 



200 



The; Nkwsdeai^er. 



mORE ABOUT " OXCE A 



I have frequently given reason 
in these columns why the trade 
should do everything possible to 
drive all publications bearing the 
imprint of P. F. Collier out of the 
market. The success his agents, 
which swarm over the country, 
are meeting with in " knocking out" 
the regular trade is intimated in the 
following paragraph from a recent 
impression of Echoes of the Week : 

"We went through Mr. P. F. 
Collier's new publishing house one 
day last week. It is something to 
take one's breath away to go 
through the immense establishment. 
There is nothing in this county like 
it. Twelve double-horse trucks 
can drive into the building, and 
stand there in the great court with- 
out interfering in any way with the 
workmen and presses. There are 
miles of offices and rooms in the 
building, and regiments of busy- 
bodies. We never saw so many 
bundles of printing-paper in our 
lives as there are in that building, 
and the immense presses were reel- 
ing off Once a Week, George 
Eliot's Works and Rudyard Kip- 
ling's, until you couldn't rest. Mr. 
Collier has a thirty years' lease of 
the building. He has ordered a 
new Hoe press that will print 8,000 
Once a Weeks, on both sides, per 
hour. The house-warming will 
come when it comes, and it will be 
one that will make the eyes of you 
stick out half-way across the At- 
lantic." 



' ' I,ESLiE & Company, ' ' who 
have traded on the well-known firm 
name for ten or twelve years, with 
more or less (generally less) suc- 
cess, are again trying to work up a 
little boom for the only two living 
out of the round dozen periodicals 
they have at divers times tried to 
establish. The two referred to 
are the Fireside Monthly and Lady' s 
Bazar, certainly the worst speci- 
mens of magazine making to be 



found on earth to-day. The pic- 
tures used are old beyond redemp- 
tion, and are worse than none at all. 
The fashions in the Ladf s Bazar 
are useless, so reliable dressmakers 
say, and the stories in either are 
the laughing stock of all who see 
them. Some way or other, some- 
where or other, the publishers have 
picked up the played-out plates of 
the old five-cent edition of the 
Brookside Library and Fireside 
Novelist, and are running them out 
again in the two magazines. In 
spite of the fact that not a line of 
new matter or an original picture 
appears in either, dealers are asked 
to sell them for the same price and 
profits as the standard magazines. 
There is no sufficient reason why 
any dealer should handle either of 
the magazines as they are now, and 
the sooner they are cut off and the 
publishers forced to discontinue or 
improve them, the better. 

1 ^m % 

Young clerks who desire to rise 
should never hesitate about doing 
any work that comes in their way. 
They should crush out the idea that 
many seem to have, that it is the 
proper thing to do as little work as 
possible for the largest pay. If a 
clerk expects to make a successful 
business man, his first thought must 
be for his employer's interest. He 
should turn his hand to whatever he 
sees to do, and not let his employ- 
er's interests suffer because the work 
happens to be the duty of someone 
else. The clerks who advance to 
positions of trust and importance, 
and possibly become members of the 
firm, are those who stand ready to 
perform any required duty, no mat- 
ter who has neglected to perform it. 



Many dealers do not seem to 
have been informed that the Weekly 
is returnable from any dealer lo- 
cated in a city or town in which 
there is no wholesale news com- 
pany. 

* ^ t 

If you see it in The News- 
dealer, it's so ! 



The Newsdealer. 



20 1 



WaFue's flotaWe Ilovels. 

The Hew Volnme is "The Arahian Ights' Entertainments," 

UNIFORM PRICE, 20 CESTS EACH (Mailag-e, 8 Cents per Pound). 

Consisting of the Masterpieces of the standard and most popular writers of fiction, complete and 
unabridged, and each novel (with but one exception) complete in one volume. 8vo size, colored pic- 
ture covers ; price, 20 cents each. J^- ORDER BY NUMBER. Write for our trad* terms. 



1 


The Scottish Chiefe, 


By Jane Porter 


32 


Caleb Williams, 


By William Godwin 


7 


Thaddeus of Warsaw, 


" 


" 


34 


The Vicar of Wakefield 


, By Oliver Goldsmith 


10 


The Hungarian Brothers, 


•' 


" 


37 


Rory O'More, 


By Samuel Lover 


3 


St. Clair of the Isles, 


By E. Helme 


82 


Handy Andy, 


(1 It n 


4 


The Children of the Abbey, 


ByE. 


M Roche 


92 


Treasure Trove, or He would 


9 


The Old English Baron, and 1 
Castle of Otranto, J 


T3«r ^*^a 


_.. -n^^-,^ 




be a Gentleman, 


" " " 




By Oiara xveevc 


46 


Stories of Waterloo, 


By W. H. Maxwell 


11 


Marriage, 


By Miss Ferrier 


47 


The Bivouac, or Stories of 


12 


Inheritance, 


" 


" 




the Peninsular War, 


" " " 


13 


Destiny. 


" 


" 


85 


Hector 0' Hallorau, 


" '• " 


14 


The King's Own, By ( 
The Naval Officer, *' 


Captain Marryat 


50 


Cyril Thornton, 


By Cap. T. Hamilton 


15 






51 


Reginald Dal ton, 


By'J. G. Lockhart 


16 


Newtou Forster, " 






52 


The Widow Barnaby, 


By Mrs. TroUope 


21 


Peter Simple, " 






55 


The Saucy Arethusa, 


By Cap. Chamier 


2:5 


Jacob Faithful. " 






64 


Ben Brace, 


" " 


27 


The Pirate, and the Three 






65 


Tom Bowling, 


II II 




Cutters, " 






56 


Jack Brag, 


By Theodore Hook 


30 


Japhet in Search of a Fath- 






58 


Robinson Crusoe, 


By Daniel Defoe 




er, " 






60 


Harry Ix)rrequer, 


By Charles Lever 


^i 


The Pacha of Many Tales, " 






89 


Jack Hinton, 


II II 11 


36 


Mr. Midshipman Easy, " 






95 


Tom Burke of Ours, 


II II II 


57 


The Phantom Ship, 






114 


The O'Donoghue, 


•' ' " 


67 


Poor Jack, " 






141 


Arthur O'Leary, 


II 11 II 


68 


'ihe Poacher, " 






70 


The Three Musketeers, 


By Alexandre Dumas 


79 


Percival Keene, " 






71 


Twenty Years After, 


" " " 


86 


Masierman Ready, " 






131 


Paul Jones, 


II II II 


91 


The Privateersman, " 






142 


Marguerite de Valois, 


II 11 II 


61 
17 


The Dog Fiend, " " 
Richelieu, By G. P. 


R. James 


134 


'^ mme°*^^^*^^ °^ ^°*'"^ } ^y ^^*=^'' ^^^° 


18 


Darnley, " 






53 


Top-Sail Sheet Blocks, 


By M. H. Barker 


19 


Philip Augustus, " 






72 


Sylvester Sound, 


By Henry Cockton 


22 


Mary of Burgundy, ' 






73 


The Love Match, 


II II 11 


24 


Jhe Gipsy, 






99 


Valentine Vox, 


II II II 


28 


Henry Masterton, " 






133 


The Sisters. 


II II 11 


29 


John Marston Hall, " 






74 


The Clock Maker, 


By Sam Slick 


36 
49 


Attila, 

The Robber, " 






""'^ plrtsIandU*^^^"^'- [BySamuelWarren 


54 


The Huguenot, " 






138 


Now and Then, 


II II II 


83 


Forest Days, " 






87 


Tough Yarns, 


By The Old Sailor 


90 


Morley Ernstein, " 






93 


Two Old Men's Tales, 


By Mrs. Marsh 


98 


The Brigand, " 






97 


Mount Sorel, 


II 11 


100 


The Smuggler, " 
Arrah Neil, " 






112 


Amelia Wyndham, 


11 II 


111 






94 


Margaret Catchpole, 
Mary Anne Wellington 


By R. Cobbold 


145 


Agincourt, " 






127 


1 " " 


59 


The Pickwick Papers, By Charles Dickens 


107 


Tag Rag & Co., 


By James Greenwood 


P2 


Nicholas Nickleby, " 






108 


Odd People in Odd Places, " " 


63 


Oliver Twist, " 






109 


Dining with Duke Humphrey," " 


75 


Barnaby Rudge, " 
The Old Curiosity Shop, " 






113 


The Ghost Hunter and 


^'^l ByJ. Banim 


76 








Family, 


96 


Martin Chuzzlewit, " 






116 


The Y'oung Duke, 


By B. Disraeli 


20 


Tom Cringle's Log, By Michael Scott 


117 


Venetia, 




25 


The Cruise of the Midge, 


' ' 


" 


118 


Alroy, 




26 


Two Years Before the Mast, 


ByR 


H. Dana 


119 


Henrietta Temple, 




38 


Pelham, Bj 
The Disowned, ' 


Lytton Bulwer 


120 


Vivian Gray, 




39 






121 


Sybil, 




40 


Devereux, ' 






122 


Coningsby, 




41 


Paul Clifford, 






123 


Contarini Fleming, 




42 


Eugene Aram, ' 






128 


The Tower of London, 


By Wm. H. Alnsworth 


43 


Last Days of Pompeii, ' 






129 


Windsor Castle, 


II II 11 


44 


Rienzi, 






130 


Rookwood, 


II 11 II 


45 


Ernest Maltravers, ' 






135 


The Miser's Daughter, 


" " " 


48 


Alice, ' 






140 


Old St. Paul's, 


II II <i 


66 


Night and Morning, ' 






132 


The Missing Partner, 


By T. M. Cobban 


84 


The Last of the Barons, ' 






137 


Jane Eyre, 


By C. Bronte 


143 


Harold, ' 






139 


Mine Own Familiar Friend. ) tj„ a t -a^,^^ 


31 


TheWolfofBadenoch, By 


Sir T. D. Lauder 




A Modem Vendetta, 


;"''"•"•"'"'"' 



KREDKRICK WARNE & CO., 

COOPER UNION, NEW YORK. 



202 



The Newsdealer. 



RECENT BOOKS REVIEWED. 



Under this heading it is intended to print 
original and selected comment concerning cur- 
rent books, which will enable dealers to con- 
verse intelligently about them with their custom- 
ers, and consequently to their own profit, without 
being compelled to wade through much matter of 
little or no interest, even had they the spare time 
to devote to it. Prosy, analytical reviews will be 
avoided. Only paper-covered books will be no- 
ticed, and the mention will be made timely as pos- 
sible. The retail price will be appended for the 
convenience of those who, not having the books 
in stock, may wish to order them. 



"The Crusade op the Excei.- 
SIOR," one of the Best of Bret 
Harte's California romances, forms 
the latest addition to the Riverside 
Paper Series. The story turns on a 
strange adventure in the Gulf of 
California, and the picture of the 
peaceful mission life of the padres is 
as fine as anything Bret Harte has 
ever drawn. 50 cents. 

" Whom God Hath Joined," by 
Frank Cahoon, is a piece of vulgar 
trash, called by courtesy a novel. 
It has nothing to commend it ex- 
cept its possible fidelity to nature, 
since hundreds will drink and be 
unfaithful to their wives, and wives 
will seek elsewhere the love which 
they do not find at home ; but there 
are some phases of life which are 
better left untouched, and this book 
deals with such topics to the exclus- 
ion of all others. 25 cents. 

"The Cartaret Affair" is a 
detective story by St. George Rath- 
borne, in which the author has de- 
parted from the customary rule of 
such stories, and has introduced a 
young lawyer who strikes the right 
scent of the authorship of a crime 
while the detective is pursuing a 
wrong one. The book has an abun- 
dance of action and incident, and 
does not violate the probabilities as 
so many of this class of stories do. 
The writer's style, too, is above the 
general run of authors of this class 
of novels. 50 cents. 

' ' Constance Winter's Choice, ' ' 
a novel written several years ago by 
a Chicago woman, Anna I^ouise 
Beckwith (Mrs. Cutter), is now re- 
published in the Globe Library. The 



story is a bright, entertaining nar- 
rative of the light order, and its 
heroine, ' ' they say, ' ' is our popular 
quondam actress, Mary Anderson. 
The story is sweet and wholesome, 
and enlivened with some quiet digs 
at fashionable ideas of the dramatic 
profession. 25 cents. 



THH NEW POEM. 



" The Light of the World." 
The verdict upon Sir Edwin Ar- 
nold's new pbem, "The Light of 
the World," will probably be that, 
while it is full of passages of ex- 
quisite melody, with here and there 
flashes of dramatic force and pas- 
sion that remind one of Browning at 
his best, still it lacks the sustained 
beauty and sweetness that has 
made ' ' The Light of Asia ' ' one of 
the most popular of modern poems. 
In the preparation of the great 
Buddhist story, Sir Edwin had 
steeped himself in Indian tale and 
legend. Something of the sensuous 
charm of the Oriental songs was 
breathed into his verse, and gave it 
the stamp of novelty. In this new 
poem, which treats of the life and 
death of Christ, the author has de- 
pended for his inspiration purely 
upon the Scriptures, though he has 
made skillful use of Buddhism as a 
foil to Christianity. The result is 
that while certain passages reach a 
lofty plane, which he seldom gained 
in his first poem, yet as a whole the 
work is not so rich in imagerj^ nor 
so striking. 

It is difficult to understand how 
so accomplished a literary artist as 
Sir Edwin could write the prelude 
to this poem, entitled " At Bethle- 
hem. " It is an account of the visit 
of the three wise men attracted by 
the star, but, though written with 
great care, it is deadly dull. The 
blank verse appears to be over- 
elaborated, and the only thing that 
redeems it is the angels' song, 
which comes in as a refi-ain at the 
close of each book. It is unfortunate 
that this stretch of thirty pages of 
dreary blank verse should be placed 



The Newsdealer. 



203 



at the opening of the poem, for it 
will serve to repel all except those 
who have the wisdom to merely 
glance through it. In fact, it bears 
a strong likeness to the custom- 
house preface to Hawthorne's 
' ' Scarlet IvCtter, ' ' which always put 
the elder Dumas in a deep sleep 
whenever he attacked it, so that he 
never reached the first page of the 
greatest of New England romances. 
We would suggest to any one who 
wishes to enjoy this poem that he 
skip the Bethlehem prologue and 
begin at the real beginning — the 
entrance of Pilate upon the scene. 
Great art is betrayed in making 
Pilate the tetrarch of three years 
after the crucifixion, haunted by 
visions of the prophet and leader 
whom he gave to a shameful death 
on the cross, and eager to learn from 
Mary Magdalene the story of her 
experience with Christ. In the in- 
troduction to the book, Sir Edwin 
surpasses himself in his pictures of 
Palestine and the changes that have 
been wrought in the places made 
sacred by the Scripture story. Per- 
haps the finest bit of description in 
the poem is this sketch of how 
spring comes in Palestine : ■ 

And ofttimes, in the Syrian spring, steals 
back 

Well nigh the ancient beauty to those 
coasts 

Where Christ's feet trod. The lily which 
he loved 

And praised for splendor passing Solo- 
mon's — 

The scarlet martagon — decks herself 
still, 

Mindful of his high words, in red and 
gold. 

To meet the step of summer. Cycla- 
mens 

Lift their pale heads to see if he will 
pass ; 

And amaryllis and white hyacinths 

Pour from their pearly vases spikenard 
forth. 

Lest he should come unhonored. 

In figure pictures, the portrait 
that is worthy to stand by the side 
of this flawless sketch of Palestine 
is the picture of Mary Magdalene, 
once a queen of sin, now a humble 
follower of her dear I/Drd. She is 
described : 



* * * * Pale 
As moonlight's heart the low, smooth 

forehead framed. 
Under the black waved hair — forehead 

and hair ; 
And eyebrows, bent like the new moon ; 

full lids ; 
Silk lashes, long and curved, shadowing 

with touch 
Of softest melancholy that worn place 
Where the tears gather — all declaring her 
A daughter of the sun, in those climes 

born 
Where light and life are larger. 

The book ends with the fierce 
outburst of Pilate, who dares not 
stay to hear more of Mary's won- 
drous story, but starts forth at early 
dawn for Sepphon's. The re- 
mainder of the poem is cast in the 
form of conferences between Mary 
and an Indian, who was one of the 
three Magi that came to Bethlehem 
when Christ was born. He is full 
of questions about the mystery of 
this new faith, and the poet makes 
admirable use of the Buddhist's lore 
to bring into greater relief the pur- 
ity and simplicity of the Gospel. 
To him Mary relates in full the 
sacred story ; how she first saw 
Christ teaching by the wayside, and 
how his words compelled her to 
cast aside the old life of sin and 
lawless desire, and follow meekly 
in his train. Then follow pictures 
of the anointing of his feet with the 
precious spikenard, the parables 
taught by the roadside, the raising 
of Jairus' daughter, the crucifixion 
and the rising from the dead. In 
verse of great sweetness and 
strength Sir Edwin has told again 
this old familiar story ; told it with 
a pathos that no reader can fail to 
feel, and with a power that carries 
one along to the noble climax. It 
it a great poem, worthy of careful 
study, for a single reading cannot 
reveal all the wealth of beauty and 
of wisdom that lies in its measured 
lines. Fifty cents. — Sa7i Francisco 
Chronicle. 



It is worth always remembering 
that the Detective Library is the 
only ten-cent series allowing a clear 
profit of forty per cent. 



204 The NEWSDEAI.ER. 

Something New. Out April 1st. 




mim 




RICE 10 



It will be issued through the American News Company and its 
Branches, and will be "on sale." Price to Dealers, 7 cents ; sells for 10 
cents. Unsold copies RETURNABLE. Send in your orders. Keep a 
good supply on hand. 



The Newsdealer. 



205 



THE OPEN COURT. 



Being a department in which dealers' opinions 
reign supreme, and therefore of special interest to 
publishers wishing to lieep in the swim. 



Olympia, Wash., Mar. 5, '91. 

' ' We believe it a good idea to 
print retail as well as wholesale 
prices of newspapers." 

J. Benson Starr. 

Newport, Ark., Feb. 11, 1891. 

' ' I get The Newsdealer every 
issue from St. Louis News Com- 
pany, and can't get along without 
it." I. D. Price. 

Hannibal, Mo., March 10, 1891. 

' ' All papers folded. The News- 
dealer is what we needed for a 
good many years." 

Jos. Morris. 

Sumner, Wash., March 5, 1891. 

"I would like all the story pa- 
pers folded and made returnable. 
Success to The Newsdealer in its 
fight with the subscription sharks." 
T. B. Darr. 

Cynthiana, Ky., March 9, '91. 

' ' I endorse the letter written by 
E. S. Kelley, of Wellsville, Ohio, of 
date February 7, 1891, in number 
seventeen. He expresses my thought 
exactly. ' ' 

K. H. Pallmeyer. 

Norfolk, Vir., Feb. 27, '91. 
' ' I notice your request to dealers, 
to notify you if they prefer papers 
folded, etc. I do not think you 
will find one on top of the earth 
who does not. Not only for con- 
venience, etc. , but they look so much 
neater on the table, as we cannot 
fold them as well." 

J. G. Spruill. 

Grayville, III., 3-1 0-' 91. 
' ' Because of the pig-headedness 
of the publishers, we make it a 
point to see that the sale of the 
' Fireside Compa?iion ' is not pushed, 
and, as a result, its sales have fallen 
off, while the more liberal story pa- 
pers have increased. Keep up the 
fight." 

Mercury News Co. 



7029 S. Broadway, \ 
St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 24, 1891.J 
' ' We think The Newsdealer a 
grand help, and like the idea of hav- 
ing the story papers come ready 
folded. They look so much smooth- 
er on the counter, and save time. 
We always favor the returnable 
papers in preference to those not re- 
turnable. ' ' 

A. Elliott & Co. 

Silver City, N. M., Feb. 24, '91. 

' ' I am certainly in favor of re- 
ceiving all papers ready folded, and 
I think it an imposition on the part 
of the publishers in sending out 
their papers unfolded, as the news- 
dealer's profit is comparatively small 
on all weeklies. The more I see of 
The Newsdealer the better I am 
pleased with it." 

C. M. Nolan. 

WINNEMUCCA, Nev., Mar. 10, '91. 

' ' Permit me to second the motion 
to have our papers come to the re- 
tail dealers cut and folded. It is a 
shame to have a lot of papers rolled 
up the wrong way when they are 
damp and green from the press. 
By the time they reach us in the 
mountains they have dried, and it 
becomes next to impossible to fold 
them and break them in the right 
way, so as to make them appear 
halfway decent. Thanks for kind 
offer to quote wholesale and retail 
prices of regular publications. I for 
one would esteem it quite a favor." 
C. ChenowETh. 

Harper, Kansas, Feb. 23, '91. 

"The Newsdealer is a great 
boon, and ought to be taken by ev- 
ery newsdealer in the United States. 
I have taken from the Southwestern 
News Company of Kansas City, 
since I received a sample copy from 
you. I am very decidedly in favor 
of receiving all papers ready folded. 
They are such a nuisance to fold 
that I never take any trouble with 
them. You pitched into the Fire- 
side Conipanio7i last week, which I 
was very glad to see. I would like 
to speak a favorable word for Good 



2o6 



The Newsdealer. 



News, I only hope it may supplant 
the Yout/i's Companion.'' 

E. E. Machell Cox, 

Beatrice, Neb., March 3, 1891. 

' ' Your valuable paper comes reg- 
ularly through the Omaha News 
Company, and we read every word 
in it. So far you certainly have 
voiced my sentiments in all you 
have said for the good of the news 
agents. The profits are small 
enough, and forty per cent, at least 
should be given, with a return privi- 
lege, and all weekly papers should 
come folded. It is almost impossible 
to fold them neatly, besides taking 
up valuable time. If every news 
agent in the country would push 
the papers that give forty per cent, 
discount and come folded, there 
would be a little better profit in the 
business." F. H. Crowell. 

Ogden, Utah, March 4, 1891. 

' ' Copy for 1 5th is to hand. I am 
glad to see you fire into the ' Lovell 
Outfit.' Since they left the News 
Company, January ist, they seem 
to hanker more after the newsdeal- 
er's business. I have given them 
the cold shoulder, and only handle 
their books on direct order, as I can 
buy most everything they publish 
at a lower price elsewhere. Your 
work on the folding of papers strikes 
me to a ' T. ' I spend two or three 
hours Sundays folding papers, and 
of course, place those already folded 
on sale first. The Fireside Compan- 
ion is lowest on my list, and all its 
sample copies I simply throw into 
the fire. I am trying to discover 
whether you are part of the News 
Company or not. ' ' 

George R. Morse. 

Seattle, Wash., March 6, 1891. 

" ' The Newsdealer is sent with 
trimmed edges when desired. ' For 
my part I think it is a great comfort 
to take a magazine or a book that 
is uncut, place it on the table before 
you, and with a good paper-cutter 
proceed to open the leaves ; in the 
operation there is a pleasant antici- 
pation of good things to be discov- 
ered when the pages are opened for 



inspection. You get yourself ready 
to digest the contents, and, as leaf 
after leaf is cut, you run across a 
heading here or an item of interest 
there ; you get somewhat familiar 
with the book in hand. When all 
the leaves are cut you are quite 
ready to enjoy the contents. I am 
glad The Newsdealer comes out 
semi - monthly, and I would be 
pleased to receive your publication 
every week. It seems the other pub- 
lications in the interest of the news- 
dealers find time to criticise you 
now and then. That shows you 
are up to the times, or they would 
not trouble themselves to mention 
' that boisterous contemporary on 
the Pacific Coast.' Hoping the day 
is not far distant when we will re- 
ceive the weekly papers folded up, 
and wishing success, I remain," 
A. T. IvUndberg. 

IvOS Angeles, Cal., Mar. 8, '91. 

' ' The article headed ' This Means 
You,' in The Newsdealer of 
March ist, struck me, and I has- 
tened to join ' the great majority ' 
by writing you a postal card. Since 
then I have read your March 15th 
number, and feel more than ever 
the necessity of the work you have 
begun. To say that I am in favor 
of having papers and magazines 
made returnable as well as sent to 
newsdealers in a proper form (by 
which I mean cut and folded), only 
mildly expresses my sentiments on 
this subject. I am comparatively 
new to the news business, but I real- 
ize as keenly as the oldest news- 
dealer in the land the advantages of 
getting one's papers cut and folded. 
There is some talk here of a protec- 
tive society for newsdealers, and I 
hope that before many moons we 
shall have one. As for sample cop- 
ies of the Fireside Companion in 
I^os Angeles, I think they are prin- 
cipally used by dress-makers and 
the like for wrapping papey . I do 
not care for notoriety through The 
Newsdealer or otherwise, but if 
my name as that of a newsdealer 
will be of any help in bringing the 



The Newsdealer. 



207 



newsdealers of the country to see 
that the only way to make the re- 
turn privilege universal (as it ought 
to be) is to boycott the non-return- 
able papers and to push those that 
are returnable, please print my name 
in capitals. Kindly print the publi- 
cation day of the Art Interchange, if 
the publishers have any regular day 
(which I very much doubt)." 

A. W. Dunning. 

Centerville, Iowa, Feb, 24, '91. 

' ' I received sample copy Number 
II of The Newsdealer, was well 
pleased with it, and immediately or- 
dered my wholesale company (West- 
ern News Company) to send it to 
me regularly, and with each suc- 
ceeding number have found it to 
meet my highest approbation. I 
also have used my best eiforts to 
bring it to the notice of my friends 
in the trade, and all have expressed 
themselves as highly pleased with 
The Newsdealer. In regard to 
papers folded, returnable, etc., it has 
been my practice to always favor 
the publishers who favor me, and, as 
a matter of course, Family Story 
Paper heads the list in numbers sold. 
The old New York Weekly s sales 
ran down until I only had one regu- 
lar, but since the return privilege 
was given, the sale of ' Weekly ' is 
coming up, and I now have seven 
regularly, and none to return. If 
Fireside Coinpayiion wishes to keep 
up with the procession, they must 
keep step to the music. Make the 
Companion returnable and folded. 
In my trade I receive publications 
issued for Saturday on that day, and 
in the same mail that I do the morn- 
ing dailies, and of course, have no 
time to fool with papers not folded, 
but those that are find a place on 
the counter immediately ; while 
those that are not have to take a 
back seat until a more convenient 
season. Robert Bonner's Sons must 
look after the interest of the news- 
dealers more carefully if they ex- 
pect many favors from them. The 
Ledger should be returnable, and is- 
sued to the trade the same day that 



it is to subscribers, and not three 
days later, as it is now." 

J, I,, Morgan, 

> ^ » 

THE BEST NEW BOOKS-TO SELL. 



Under this heading it is intended to list only 
salable new books and fresh cheap editions of 
standard books. The literary excellence of those 
listed may not always be apparent, but they are 
of the kinds the masses squander their shekels 
for. All are in paper covers unless otherwise 
noted. Books listed are all mailable at one cent 
a pound except those marked with a *, Postage 
on such books is eight cents a pound. 



" Money," Emile Zola, Nile Ser- 
ies 4, 25 cents. 

"His Last Passion," Martins, 
Minerva Series 41, 25 cents. 

"Ruy Bias," Victor Hugo, Sea 
and Shore Series 7, 25 cents. 

" Put Asunder," Bertha M. Clay, 
Primrose Series 16, 50 cents. 

" The Gay Captain," Mrs. M. V. 
Victor, Select Series 79, 25 cents. 

" A Goddess in Exile," Philip S. 
Warne, Select Series 81, 25 cents. 

"Sappho," Alphonse Daudet, 
Sea and Shore Series 29, 25 cents. 

" Bel-Ami," Guy de Maupassant, 
Nile Publishing Company , 50 cents. * 

"Texas Jack," Ned Buntline, 
Sea and Shore Series 28, 25 cents, 

"Beryl's Husband," Mrs. Har- 
riet Lewis, Ledger Library 34, 50 
cents. 

' ' The Lone Ranch, ' ' Captain 
Mayne Reid, Primrose Series 15, 50 
cents. 

' ' The Cartaret Affair, "St. George 
Rathbome, Library of Choice Fic- 
tion 13, 50 cents, 

" Thrice Wedded, but Only Once 
a Wife," Mrs. Georgie Sheldon, Se- 
lect Series 80, 25 cents. 



" Valmond, THE Crank," first 
issued in Albany, has been pur- 
chased by New Yorkers, and is now 
issued as a number of the Twentieth 
Century Library. The retail price 
has been increased to thirty-five 
cents, 



208 



The Newsdeai^er. 



The Newsdealer. 

Warren Ei,bridge Price, Editor. 



Entered at San Francisco Postoffice a» Seoond-CIasB Matter. 
March 5, 1891. 



Vol. II. 



APRIL 1, 1891. 



No. 18. 



Copyright, 1891, by M. V. Thomas. 

Publisher's Notices. 



The Newsdeai^er is published semi- 
monthly. 

The price of subscription is $2.00 a 
year, in advance, to any address in the 
United States or Canada. Foreign post- 
age 50 cents extra. Remittances should 
be sent to The NewsdeaIvER, 1203 
Market street, San Francisco, California. 

News companies professing to supply 
current publications are obliged to fill 
orders for The Newsdealer, which is 
always obtainable. Papers are not sent 
to subscribers after their subscriptions 
have expired unless renewed. 

TERMS OF ADVERTISING; 

Each Insertion. 

One Page, - - - - $10.00 

Half Page, 6.00 

Quarter Page, - - - - 3.00 

Eighth Page, - - - - 2.00 

Applications for space honored strictly 
in order of receipt. 

A discount of 25 per cent, on space 
occupied three or more successive 
months. 

Advertiser's copy should reach the ed- 
itor no later than the tenth and twenty- 
fifth of each month ; earlier would be 
preferable. 

EGO NOXHS. 



Return unsold copies of the 
World Almanac before April ist. 
After that date it will not be re- 
turnable. 

If you wish to see this journal grow 
in size, introduce it to your brother 
dealers, and carry out so far as may 
be possible the excellent ideas ad- 
vanced by E. S. Kelley in number 
seventeen. 

It is well to keep a close watch 
on the price of every Seaside sold 
these days. A good many thirty- 
cent numbers are now being issued, 
and, as they are no larger to the eye 



than many twenty-cent ones, mis- 
takes — always the wrong way — are 
apt to occur with anyone. 

If the pleasantly increased num- 
ber of advertising favors is contin- 
ued, The Newsdealer will at 
once enlarge, in order that dealers 
may be given their full quota of 
reading matter. 

' ' Francis Bacon and His Se- 
cret Society ' ' is the startling title 
of another contribution to the liter- 
ature of the Bacon-Shakespeare con- 
troversy. The author is Mrs. Henry 
Pott, of London, editor of " Bacon's 
Promus." Strange to say, she has 
chosen a Chicago publishing house 
(F. J. Schulte & Company) to bring 
out her book, which will appear in 
May, Those who have been permitted 
to see the manuscript pronounce it a 
work of great literary merit and won- 
derful scholarship. 

Quite a number — and the very 
best — of Bertha M. Clay's novels 
are now to be had in Laird & Lee's 
Pastime Series. Owing to their 
greater bulk, they will sell more 
readily and bring better prices than 
the Trust editions of the same 
books. As the profit on the Laird 
& Lee books is far ahead of that 
allowed by the Trust, they should 
be given the preference every time. 

Competition among publishers 
is a good thing for the trade in more 
ways than one. The beautiful way 
in which the Nile Publishing Com- 
pany "scooped " the field in getting 
the earliest edition of ' ' Money, ' ' the 
new book by Emile Zola, on the 
market, is a neat example of the vim 
and enterprise which must be behind 
this house to produce such results in 
advance of the old stagers, whom 
one might well suppose would know 
the ropes, and thus ward off defeat. 



-W^EST COAST DEAI^ERS. 

Wishing prompt supplies at proper prices of such 
saleable books as " Bel Ami," " Money," " Woman 
of Fire," "Caesar's Column," " Hepiameron," 
" Fortunio," " Fortune of the Rongons," " Mile, de 
Maupln." etc., etc., should call on or address 
WEST COAST BOOK STORE, 1203 Market St., Sau 
Francisco' 



The Newsdealer. 



209 



II.I.U8T11ATEI> A9IE:RICAIi«." ANOTHER MAGAZINE COMING. 



The publishers of this publica- 
tion continue to keep what is com- 
monly called "a stifF upper lip," 
but they cannot hide the fact that 
the paper is not holding its own by 
any means. The numerous Httle 
black-faced notices offering a ' ' six- 
ty-four page handsomely illustrated 
weekly for less than twenty cents 
per week" to the public at large, 
have been withdrawn, because with 
number fifty-four the size of the 
journal was cut down from sixty- 
four to forty-eight pages per issue. 
Not a word about this great reduc- 
tion in size was mentioned in the 
paper, but the public observed it just 
the same, and look at it as an in- 
dication of approaching dissolution. 
Whether this is so remains to be 
seen, but it is not easy to believe 
any great number of people will 
give twenty-five cents for forty-eight 
pages oi Illustrated American, when 
128 pages oi Scribner' s or Cosmopol- 
ita7i can be had for the same money. 
The publishers are perhaps begin- 
ning to realize they did wrong in 
antagonizing the trade, but still 
blunder along, not seeing any way 
of retrieving their falling fortunes. 



lyOVEiviv's Leather-Clad Tales, De- 
tective Series, and American Novelists' 
Series are worth making standing or- 
ders for — something that cannot be 
said of many series the Trust pro- 
duces. All three are returnable, 
if uncut, and allow a clean profit of 
forty-four cents on every dollar's 
worth disposed of. The increased 
profit on these books was directly 
produced by The Newsdealer's 
readers refusing almost absolutely to 
handle them at the former price, 
and so brought the old lady to terms. 



OE SrECIAt, INTEREST. 



There is small profit in the subscription busi- 
ness at the bept, and, in order that you may get 
the lowest possible rates, always send your orders 
through the Kenyon News and Postal Subscription 
Co., 260 South Clark St., Chicago. Send a postal 
for their trade catalogue. It will pay you all the 
year round. « 



The Photo American Review, j 

92-94 Fifth Avenue, > 

New York, March 7, 1891. ) 

I shall publish a monthly maga- 
zine similar in size to Cefitiiry, Har- 
per, Cosmopolitan, etc., amongst the 
principal features of which will be 
at least thirty-two pages devoted to 
short reviews and a complete record 
of current periodicals and books, 
and at least thirty-two pages of il- 
lustrations of different localities of 
interest in America, with short de- 
scriptive matter. There will be not 
less than 10,000 copies of each issue, 
which will be circulated amongst 
publishers, book-sellers and the 
reading public. I propose to spare 
no expense necessary to make The 
Photo American Review as perfect as 
the art of the present time will per- 
mit, especially the illustrations, 
which will be original and executed 
in my own establishment. 

I remain, yours respectfully, 

Harry C. Jones. 

Edition for December, 1888, 16.000 copies. 
Edition for December, 1890, 100,000 copies. 

The Brilliant Success 

OF A 

BRILLIAiNT MAGAZINE 

THB> 

Cosmopolitan 

Published Monthly in New York City, has ha-l the 
effect of rousing other magazines, which were al- 
ready strongly attractive in their Uterary skill and 
pictorial art, to a still greater effort. 
Could the most favorable criticism of 

The Cosmopolitan 

Be more significant than that one luminous fact? 

NEWSDEALERS 

Take notice that this magazine is RETURNABLE. 

If you do not now keep it fors-ale, order a few • 
copies ; let your patrons see it. It will do the rest. 

If you wish posters, etc., address 

The Cosmopolitan Pub. Co. 

BROADWAY and FIFTH AVE. 

ni£W YORK CITY. 



2IO 



The Newsdealer. 



nJBl,ICATIOJNf DAY TABI^IS. 



This list, which will be kept standing, aims to show at a glance the day of the week the leading 
•weekly periodicals are put on sale in the more important cities of the country. Assisted by this, a mo- 
ment's thought will inform a dealer, no matter where located, just what day he may expect to receive 
the papers quoted. In this list Monday is considered the first day of the week, Tuesday the second, and 
■so on, the days of the week being represented by the figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7. The editor will consider 
it a favor if dealers in the cities named will notify him of any permanent change in the programme. 



Publication. 



N. Y. Chicago S. F. Denver St. Lo. K. C'y HI. 0. Boston 



American Field 5 

American Machinist 4 

American Musician 6 

Argosy 6 

Banner of Light 5 

Banner Weekly 6 

Boys of New York 6 

Clipper, N. Y 3 

Courrier des Etats-Unis "W 3 

Dramatic News 3 

Dramatic Mirror 3 

Electrical Engineer 4 

Electrical Review 3 

Electrical World 3 

Family Story Paper 6 

Fireside Companion 6 

Forest and Stream '. 4 

Fox's Weekly 5 

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly 2 

Freeman, Dublin. Reprint 2 

Free Press, Detroit 3 

Golden Days 6 

Golden Hours 6 

Golden Weekly 4 

Good News 4 

Oraphic, Chicago 6 

Harper's Bazar 4 

Harper's Weekly 2 

Holiday 6 

Illustrated American 2 

Illustrated News of the World. . . 3 

Irish World 3 

Journalist 6 

Judge 

Life 



, 2 

2 

Mercury, N. Y., W 6 

Munsey's Weekly i 

Nachrichten aus Deutschland. ... 2 

Nation 4 

New York Weekly 6 

Once a Week 2 

Peck's Sun 5 

Pilot 4 

Police Gazette 4 

Police News 3 

Public Opinion 5 

Puck. 2 

Saturday Night 6 

Scientific American 3 

Scientific American Supp 3 

Spirit of the Times 5 

Sporting Life 6 

Sporting News 5 

Sporting Times 6 

Standard 3 

Texas Siftings 2 

Town Topics 4 

Truth 4 

Twentieth Century 4 

Waverly Magazine 5 

Youth's Companion 6 



4 I 

4 I 

I 4 

6 6 



5 
6 
6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
6 

5 
6 
6 

5 
I 
3 

3 
2 
6 
6 
4 
4 
5 
6 

4 
4 
3 
4 
5 
I 

3 
3 
I 

I 
3 
5 
6 

3 
4 
5 
5 
4 
6 

3 
6 

5 
5 
6 

7 
6 

7 
5 
2 

5 
5 
6 

5 
6 



6 
6 
2 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
I 
6 
6 
6 
I 
I 
4 
5 
4 
6 
6 

4 
6 
I 
I 

5 
I 
2 

5 
6 
2 
4 
5 
2 
I 

5 
I 
6 

5 
6 
6 
6 

5 
I 

4 
6 
6 
6 
I 
I 
I 
2 
6 
2 
I 
I 
6 
6 
I 



4 
4 
I 
6 

5 
6 
6 
5 
4 
5 
5 
4 
6 

5 
6 
6 
6 
I 
3 
3 
3 
6 
6 

4 
6 

5 
6 

4 
2 
2 
4 
5 
I 

3 
4 
I 
I 

3 
6 
6 
4 
4 
5 
5 
4 
6 

3 
6 

5 
5 
I 
I 
6 
I 

5 
2 
6 
6 

4 
6 



5 
4 
I 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 

5 
6 
6 
6 
I 
3 
4 
3 
6 
6 

4 
6 

5 
6 

4 
4 

I 

5 
5 
I 

3 
4 
I 

I 

4 
6 
6 
4 
5 
6 

5 
5 
I 

3 
6 

5 
5 
I 
I 
6 
I 
6 
I 
6 
6 
6 
6 
I 



5 t> 

5 4 
I I 

6 6 



I 

6 

6 

5 

5 

5 

5 

I 

I 

6 

6 

6 

6 

I 

4 

4 

3 3 

6 6 

6 6 

4 
6 
6 
5 
3 
5 
2 

4 
4 
I 
2 
2 
6 
I 



The Newsdealer. 211 

THK I<AXESX BOOKS. 



Retail prices are given. For trade prices and privileges see wliolesale list elsewhere. Figures after 
title or authors indicate the price of the book in dimes. These books are all mailable at one cent 
& pound except " Petersons' New 2&-Cent Series " and " Miscellaneous." 



BEADI^E'S "dime" library. 

648 Gold Glove Gid, the Man of Grit. Wni. G. Patten. 

649 Buck Taylor, the Saddle King. Col. Prentiss Ingraham. 

BEADLE'S "half-dime" LIBRARY. 

711 Broadway Billy at Santa Fe. J. C. Cowdrick. 

712 The Mesmerist Sport. Lieut. A. K. Sims. 

713 Carl, the Mad Cowboy. Col. Prentiss Ingraham. 

BEADLE'S POCKET LIBRARY. 
5 Cents Each. 
376 Buckskin Dick's Clean Sweep. Arthur F. Holt. 

BOYS' STAR LIBRARY. 
5 Cents Each. 
196 The Deaf and Dumb Detective. Allan Arnold. 

DETECTIVE LIBRARY. 
10 Cents Each. 

431 The Fireman Detective, Police Captain Howard. 

432 Berth No. 20. Old Cap. Lee. 

433 After the James Boys. D. W. Stevens. 

DEUTSCHE LIBRARY. 

234 Ein Mann. Herman Heiberg. 2. 

HAND BOOK LIBRARY. 

8 The Modern Hoyle. 2%. 

9 Herrmann's Tricks With Cards. 2)^. * 

judge's LIBRARY. 
10 Cents Each. 
24 Reilly's 400. 

LEDGER LIBRARY. 
50 Cents Each. 

32 The Breach of Custom. From the German, by Mrs. D. M. Lowrey. 

33 The Northern Light. E. Werner. 

34 Beryl's Husband. Mrs. Harriet Lewis. 

LIBRARY OF CHOICE FICTION. 

13 The Cartaret Affair. St. George Rathbome. 5. 
17 The Youngest Brother. Ernst Wichert. 5. 

LITTLE CHIEF LIBRARY. 
5 Cents Each. 

235 Boy Pathfinder. C. Leon Meredith. 

236 Bertrand, the Gambler King. Dayton Mulgrove. 

237 Bob, the Boy Detective. Morris Redwing. 

LOG CABIN LIBRARY. 
10 Cents Each. 
X03 Buffalo Bill at Wounded Knee. W. B. Lawson. 
104 Jesse James Among the Moonshiners. W. B. Lawson. 

LOVELL'S LEATHER-CLAD TALES. 
29 The Rival Battalions. Brooks McCormick. 2>^. 

LOVELL'S Vl'ESTMINSTER SERIES. 
26 The Mystery of No. 13. Helen B. Mathers. 2)4. 



212 The Newsdeai^er. 

I,OVEI,I,'S AMERICAN AUTHOR'S SERIES. ' 

i8 Cecile Dreeme. Theodore Winthrop. 5. 

I,OVEI,I<'S INTERNATIONAI. SERIES. 
50 Cents Each. 

145 A Double Knot. George Manville Fenn. 

146 A Lost Illusion. Leslie Keith. 

MANUAL IvIBRARY, 
10 Cents Each. 

21 Every Day Cook Book. 

22 Boxing. 

23 Love, Courtship and Marriage. 

24 Ross' P^encing Instructor. Prop. G. C. Ross. 

MINERVA SERIES. 

41 His Last Passion. Martins. 2%. 

42 Fashionable Sins. Stella Chapman. 2%. 

NII,E .SERIES. 
4 Money. Emile Zola. 2)^2- 

NUGGET 1.IBRARY. 
5 Cents Each. 

83 Sam Ricketty. Ned Buntline. 

84 Grimsey's New Game. "Comic." Will Winner. 

OI,D CAP COI.I.IER IvIBRARY. 
10 Cents Each. 

396 Sitting Bull's White Ward. 

397 Kicking Bear's Last Shot. Wild Bill. 

PRIMROSE SERIES. 
50 Cents Each. 

15 The Lone Ranch. Capt. Mayne Reid. 

16 Put Asunder. Bertha M. Clay. 

17 A Social Meteor. Clement R. Marley. 

RED LETTER SERIES. 
79 The Great Taboo. Grant Allen. 2%. 

RIALTO SERIES. 
33 Told in the Hills. Marah Ellis Ryan. 5. 

SECRET SERVICE SERIES. 
25 Cents Each. 

41 Mabel Seymour. Chas. Matthew. 

42 Caught in the Net. Emile Gaboriau. 

SEA AND SHORE SERIES. 
25 Cents Each. 

28 Texas Jack. Ned Buntline. 

29 Sappho. Alphonse Daudet. 
7 Ruy Bias. Victor Hugo. 

SELECT SERIES. 
25 Cents Each. 

79 The Gay Captain. Mrs. M. V. Thomas. 

80 Thrice Wedded, But Only Once a Wife. Mrs. Georgie Sheldon. 

81 A Goddess in Exile. Philip S. Warne. 

SUNSHINE SERIES. 

61 Atman. Francis Howard Williams. 5. 

SELECT SPEAKERS. 
10 Cents Each. 
I Exhibition Speaker. 

3 Young American's Speaker. 

4 School Girl's Speaker. 



The Newsdeai^er. 



213 



SEI^ECT DIAI^OGUES. 
10 Cents Each. 

3 Dramatic Dialogues. 

4 Original Dialogues. 

SEASIDE WBRARY. 

1759 The Honorable Miss. L.T.Meade. 2. 

1763 John Herring. S. Baring Gould. 3. 

1767 Dramas of Life. George R. Sims. 2. 

1771 The Wages of Sin. Lucas Malet. 3. 

1775 Name and Fame. Adeline Sargeant. 2. 

1783 The Great Taboo. Grant Allen. 2. 

TWENTIETH CENTURY LIBRARY. 

35 Valmond, the Crank. "Nero." 2}-^. 

VANITY FAIR SERIES. 

I Philip Henson, M. D. George Hastings. 5. 

WIDE-AWAKE WBRARY. 
5 Cents Each. 

1034 Dick Dart, or the Friend of the Revenue Cutter. Berton Bertrew. 

1035 The Boy Slave of New York. C. Little. 

1036 Around the World in a Sail Boat. Harry Kennedy. 

1037 Fred Fresh. "Comic." Tom Teaser. 

1038 Old Buckskin. Paul Braddon. 

1039 " Sport," the New York Bootblack. N. S. Wood. 



Bel-Ami. 



MISCELI,ANEOUS. 
Guy de Maupassant. 5. 



I»RICE-1,ISX NOXHS. 



The "Dramatic Review, " "Idler, " 
" Ph5-sical Culture," " Pomeroy's 
Democrat," " Public Service Re- 
view," "New York Star," all be- 
ing extinct, are dropped from the 
list. 

"Fireside Monthl}-," "Lady's 
Bazar, " " Engraver and Printer, ' ' 
"Freethinker's Magazine," " Cou- 
turiere," "Journal des Modes," 
"Doll's Dressmaker," "Dramatic 
Brevities, " " Select Dialogues ' ' and 
' ' Select Speakers ' ' are now listed 
for the first time. 

The ' ' Wasp ' ' cannot hereafter be 
returned when more than thirty 
days old. The Newsdealer ven- 
tures the assertion verj^ few dealers 
care to carry it that long. 

The ' ' Household ' ' is now re- 
turnable. 



Shori Stories promptly adopted 
the idea of placing the names of its 
authors on the cover after Romance 
introduced it. The change is an 
improvement, at all events. 



The Ariel Library. 

Books that will live forever. 
No. 1. (Fourteenth Edition now selling.) 

CESAR'S COLUMN, 

By IGNATIUS DONNELLY 
No. 2. (Filth Edition.) 

A Kentucky Colonel, 

By OPIE F>. RECA.D 
No. 3. (Second Edition.) 

AN INDIANA MAN, 

By I-^ROY ARMSTRONG 

No. 4. (First Edition of 10,000 copies will be 
ready April Ist.) 

A Tramp in Society, 

By ROBT. H. COWDREY 

Price, 50 centR in paper binding. Mailable at 
pound rates. Liberaidiscounts to the trade. 

Nothing but clean, popular, STRONG, AMERI- 
CAN books will be issued in this Series. 

F. J. SCHULTE & CO., Publishers, 

332-385 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



214 The N:ewSDEAi,ER. 

To the Trade, 25 Cent Series, 11 Cents ; 50 Cent Series, 22 Cents, 



American* Series. 



OI«r>E^I« IvISSTS, 



TWENTY-FIVE CENT SEKIES. 



JUST ISSUED. 

The Plunger. Hawley Smart. 

The Other Man's Wife. John Strange Winter. 

The Wonderful Adventures of Phra the Phoeni- 
cian. Retold by Edwin Lester Arnold. 

The Light That Failed. Rudyard Kipling. 

Wormwood. Marie Corelli. 

The World's Deaire. H. Rider Haggard and An- 
drew Lang. 

The Demoniac. Walter Besant. 

Alas. Rhoda Broughton. 

Heriot's Choice. Rosa N. Carey. 
1 The Story of the Gadbys. Rudyard Kipling. 
I He Went for a Soldier. John S. Winter. 

Ruflino. Ouida. 

All Sorts and Conditions of Men. Walter Besant 
and James Rice. 

Lover or Friend. Rosa N. Carey. 

Blind Fate. Mrs. Alexander. 

A Marriage at Sea. W. Clark Russell. 

A Fatal Dower. By Author of " The Story of an 
Error." 

Soldiers Three. By Rudyard Kipling. 

Ca.st Up by the Sea. By Sir Samuel W. Baker. 

Armorel of Lyonesse. By Walter Besant. 

Plain Tales from the Hills. By Rudyard Kipling. 

April's Lady. By The Duchess. 

The Story of an Error. By Author of "The 
Wedded Wife." 

The First Violin. By Jessie Fothergill. 

The Baffled Conspirators. By W. E. Norris. 

By Order of the Czar. By Joseph Hatton. 

Artist and Model. Rene De Pont-Jest. 

Frozen Hearts. G. Webb Appleton. 

A Noble Woman. Henry Greville. 

My Wonderful Wife. Marie Corelli. 

This Wicked World. Mrs. H. Lovett Cameron. 

Lord Lisle's Daughter. Charlotte M. Braeme. 

A Daughter's Sacrifice. F. C. Philips. 

Beatrice. H. Rider Haggard. 

A Last Love. Georges Ohnet. 

Syrlin. Ouida. 

A Born Coquette. The Duchess. 

Stage-Land. Jerome K. Jerome. 

Two Masters. B. M. Croker. 

The Courting of Dinah Shadd. Rudyard Kipling. 

Part of the Property. Grace Whitby. 

Ttie Great Mill St. Mystery. Adeline Sargent. 

The Confessions of a Woman. Mabel Collins. 

Three Men in a Boat. Jerome K. Jerome. 

Dmitri. F. W. Bain, M. A. 

The Keeper of the Keys. F. W. Robinson. 

A Woman's War. By Chailotte M. Braeme. 

Paul Nuget, Materialist. By Helen F. Hethering- 
ton (Gullifer) and Rev. H. Darwin Burton. 

Margaret Byng. By F. C. Phillips. 

The Phantom Rickshaw. By Rudyard Kipling. 

What Gold Cannot Buy. By Mrs. Alexander. 

A Woman's Heart. By Mrs. Alexander. 



The Picture of Dorian Grey. By Oscar Wilde. 
Weaker than a Woman. By Charlotte M. Braeme. 
Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow. By Jerome K. 

Jerome, 
f Her Last Throw. By The Duchess. 
\ The Moment After. By Robert Buchanan. 
A March in the Ranks. Jessie Fothercill. 
The Dean's Daughter. Sophie F. F. Veith. 
Julitis Courtney, or, Master of His Fate. J. Mac- 

Laren Cobban. 
Dodo and I. Captain A. Haggard. 
Blind Love. Wilkie Collins. 
Kit and Kitty. R. D. Blackmore. 
Allan's Wife. H. Rider Haggard. 
Only a Mill Girl. Eric Sic Koss. 
A Life's Remorse. The Duchess. 
Little Primrose. Wenona Oilman. 
The Awakening of Mary Fenwick. Beatrice 

Whitby. 
Passion's Slave. Richard Ashe King. 
The Deemster. Hall Caine. 
Young Mr. Ainslie's Courtship. F. C. Philips. 
Mrs. Fenton. W. E. Norris. 
The Master of Ballantrae. R.L.Stevenson. 
A Hardy Norseman. Edna Lyall. 
A Fiery Ordeal. Bertha M. Clay. 
Roland Oliver. Justin McCarthy, M. P. 
Giraldi. Ross G. Dering. 
Marooned. W. Clark RusselL 
The Pennycomequicks. S. Baring Gould. 
Mistress Beatrice Cope. M. E. LeClerc. 
Merle's Crusade. Rosa N. Carey. 
A Lost Wife. Mrs. H. L. Cameron. 
Birch Dene. William Westall. 
Phantom Future. H. S. Herriman. 
Derrick Vaughan. Edna Lyall. 
In the Golden Days. Edna Lyall. 
A Troublesome Girl. The Duchess. 
Won by Waiting. Edna Lyall. 
A Crooked Path. Mrs. Alexander. 
The Search for Basil Lyndhurst. Rosa N. Carey. 
Cleopatra. H. Rider Haggard. 
Donovan. Edna Lyall. 
Guilderoy. Ouida. 
Knight-Errant. Edna Lyall. 
We Two. Edna Lyall. 
The Man-Hunter. Dick Donovan. 
Little Mrs. Murray. F. C. Philips. 
Be Quick and Be Dead. Ophelia Hives. 
Under Currents The Duchess. 
Miss Bretherton. Mrs. Humphry Ward. 
Will. Georges Ohnet. 
Story of an African Farm. (Olive Schreiner) 

Ralph Iron. 
Colonel Quaritch, V C. H. Rider Haggard. 
Lora Thorne. Charlotte M. Braeme. 
A Mere Child. L. B. Walford. 
Sylvia Arden. Oswald Crawford. 



THE TRADE SUPPJLIED BY THE 

American News Oompany and Their Branches. 



The NewsdeaivEr. 215 

IVERS' AMERICAN SERIES. 



Madame Midas. Ferg:us W. Hume. 

Diana Harrington. Mrs. John Croker. 

The Mystery of St. James Park. John Bloundelle 

Burton. 
Maiwa's Revenge. H Rider ITaggard. 
The Hon. Mrs. Vereker. The Duchess. 
Spurious. J. Barney Low. 
Mr. Meeson's Will. H. Rider Haggard. 
The Lampligliter Maria S. Cummins. 
Miracle Gold. Richard Dowling. 
Mollie's Story. Frank Merrj-fleld. 
Dr. Glennie's Daughter. B. L. Farjeon. 
Widow Bedott Papers. F. M. Whitcher. 
Cradled in a Storm. Theodore A. Sharp. 
A Woman's Face. Florence Warden. 
The Abbey Murder. Joseph Hatton. 
The Nameless Man. F. DuBoisgobey. 
A Life's Mistake. Mrs. H. Lovett Cameron. 
An Aristocrat in America. One of Them. 
The Mystery of a Hansom Cab. F. W. Hume. 
Herr Paulus. Walter Besant. 
Only the Governess. Rosa N. Carey. 
The Nun's Curse. Mrs. J. H. Riddell. 
A Life's Interest Mrs. Alexander. 
Marvel. The Duchess. 
Mona's Choice. Mrs. Alexander. 
Vendetta. Marie Corelli. 

Misadventure of John Nicholson. R. L. Stevenson. 
Saddle and Sabre. Hawley Smart. 
Texar's Revenge. Jules Verne. 
A Tale of Three Lions. H. Rider Haggard. 
The Frozen Pirate. W. Clark Russell. 
Jack and Three Jills. F. C. Philips. 
Strange Adventures of Lucy Smith. F. C. Philips. 
Handy Andy. Samuel Lover. 
The Frontiersmen. Gustave Aimard. 
Social Vicissitudes. F. C. Philips. 
The Felon's Bequest. F. DuBoisgobey. 
Scheherazade. F. Warden. 
The Duchess. The Duchess. 
Camille. Alex. Dumas. 
A Lucky Young Woman. F. C. Philips. 
Mary Jane's Memoirs. Geo. R. Sims. 
A Modern Circe. The Duchess. 
The Duke's Secret. Charlotte Braeme. 
The Parisian Detective. F. DuBoisgobey. 
Bag of Diamonds. Geo. Manville Fenn. 
The Dean and His Daughter. F. C. Philips. 
Sabina Zembra. William Black. 
The Golden Hope. W. Clark Russell. 



Wooed and Married. Rosa N. Carey. 

Allan Quartermain. H. Rider Haggard. 

As In a Looking-Glass. F. C. Philips. 

The Nine of Heart-s. B. L. Farjeon. 

Dawn. H. Rider Haggard. 

The Shadow of Sin. Charlotte Braeme. 

She. H. Rider Haggard. 

The Romance of a Poor Young Man. O. Feuillet. 

Lady Audley's Secret Miss M. E. Braddon. 

East Lynne. Mrs. Henry Wood. 

Wee Wifle. Rosa R. Carey. 

Jess. H. Rider Haggard. 

Uncle Max. Rosa N. Carey. 

King Solomon's Mines. H. Rider Haggard. 

The Outsider. Hawley Smart. 

The Witch's Head. H. Rider Haggard. 

Baptized with a Curse. Edith Stewart Drewry. 

By Woman's Wit. Mrs. Alexander. 

Dr. Cupid. Rhoda Broughton. 

A Bachelor's Blunder. W. E. Norris. 

The Merry Men, and other Tales and Fables. R. 
L. Stevenson. 

Kidnapped. Robert Loms Stevenson. 

A Cardinal Sin. Hugh Conway. 

The Mark of Cain. Andrew Lang. 

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll, and Prince Otto. Rob- 
ert Louis Stevenson. 

The Evil Genius. Wilkie Collins. 

Beaton's Bargain. Mrs, Alexander and the: 
Haunt d Chamber. The Duchess. 

Living or Dead. Hugh Conway. 

The Mayor of Casterbridge. Thos. Hardy. 

" King" Arthur. Mrs. Mulock. 

I Have Lived and Loved. Mrs. Forrester.. 

A Fallen Idol. F. Anstey. 

Pretty Miss Bellew. Theo. Gift. 

The Secret of Her Life. -Edward Jenkins. 

Doris' Fortune. i'\ Warden. 

Maid. Wife or Widow. Mrs. Alexander. 

Bound by a Spell. Hugh Conway. 

Tangles "Unravelled. Evelyn Kymball Johnsoa 
(Flora McFlimsey). 

Fair Women. Mrs. Forrester. 

A Wicked Girl Mary Cecil Hay. 

My Friend Jim. W, E Norris. 

New Arabian Nights. R. L. Stevenson. 

Lady Valworth's Diamonds. The Duchess. 

A House Party. Ouida. 

Once Again. Mrs. Forrester. 

Mohawks. Miss Braddon. 



FIFTY- CENT SELECTIONS. 

AMERICAN SCRIES— EXTRA ISSUE. 



Ardath. Marie Corelli. 

Robert Elsmere. Mrs. Humphrey Ward. 

A Romance of Two Worlds. Marie Corelli. 



A Disputed Inheritance. TImayenis. 
Spurgeou's Gold. Rev. E. H. Swem. 
Thelma. Marie Corelli. 



The above Series are entered as second-class matter, and can be sent 
by mail to any part of the United States or Canada at one cent per pound. 



In Ordering: any of tlie above Series, please call for 

IVERS' "AMERICAN SERIES," 

To the Trade, 25 Cent Series, 11 Cents ; 60 Cent Series, 22 Cents. 

THE TRADE SUPPLIED BY THE 

Aierican Hews Company and Their Branclies. 



2l6 



The Newsdealer. 



THE GRAPHIC, 

CHICAQO. 

Chicago's Popular Illustrated Weekly. 

From Lyman J. Gage, President of the World's Columbian Exposition : 

"As an exponent of the progress and attractions incidental to the World's 
Columbian Exposition, it will doubtless have especial interest and value." 
"THE GRAPHIC, Chicago, is the journalistic success of the day." 



IT IS BEINtt EXTENSIVELY ADVERTISED. 

IT SHOULD BE ON EVKRY NEWS-STAND. 



DO NOT FAII, TO INCI,UDE 



In your next order to your News Company. 

Retail Price, 10 cents; Subscription per Year, t$3.0O. Trade Prlc^, 7 cents; 
Trade Subsrrlptlon, IS2.25. 

THE GRAPHIC COMPANY, Dearborn & Randolph Sts., Chicago. 



The Graphic, of Chicago, is one of 
the booming illustrated weeklies. 
Its twenty-four pages of reading and 
illustrations give evidence of edi- 
torial and artistic talent. Its news- 
stand sales in many localities exceed 
those of all other illustrated weeklies 
combined. It is doing some good 
World's Fair illustrating, in which 
work it has the cooperation of the 
Exposition management. This ac- 
counts, no doubt, in considerable 
measure for its great and growing 
popularity. At seven cents a copy 
to the trade, it affords a satisfactory 
margin. 



Stories of the ' ' James Boys ' ' 
are so much and continually in de- 
mand, it would be a good idea for 
every dealer to keep a special pile 
devoted to the outlaw gentlemen, 
and keep it always well supplied 
with stories of " the gang." Some- 
thing like one hundred "James 
Boys" stories have thus far been 
published in the Detective and Log 
Cabin "libraries." 



" Cecii. Dreeme," a recent addi- 
tion to I^ovell's American Authofs' 
Series, was first issued in 1862. For 
years Henry Holt & Company have 
had a pretty thirty-cent edition on 
the market in their Leisure Moment 
Series, but now, the plates having 
come under control of the Ivovell's, 
who came into the field vowing not 
to increase prices, the price of the 
thirty-3'ear-old and all but forgotten 
novel has been increased to half a 
dollar. 

THE MATCHLESS BOOZ. 

OONFESSIOHS OF A NUN, 

By SISTER ACiATHA. 

12 mo., 337 pages, price 50c. 



NEWSDEALERS— You will find the Nun to be 
the Quickest seller you ever handled. One news- 
stana sold 120 In eight days. Fourth edition of 
25,000 now on the press. 



ORDER FROm YOUR JOBBER. 

JORDAN BROTHERS, Publishers 

211 N. 9th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Newsdealer. 



217 



WHOLESALE 

Price and Returnable List 

OF PERIODICALS COMMONLY HANDLED 
BY NEWSDEALERS. 



It is corrected every month up to the hour of 
going to press. Prices quoted here are those of the 
San Francisco News Company. Dealers buying of 
other News Companies will find occasional, gener- 
ally slight, variations from this list. When prices 
differ from those in this list they should be cheap- 
er ; if dearer write the editor at once. 

Weeklies are designated by the letter W.; Semi- 
Weeklies by the letters S. Vv.; Semi-Monthlies by 
the letters S. M.; Monthlies by the letter M.; Bi- 
Monthlies by the letters B. M.: Quarterlies by the 
letter Q.; Semi- Annuals by the letters S. A. " R " 
after a publication signifies that unsold copies may 
be returned. When the "R" and a price are 
printed together that is the amount allowed on 
copies returned ; otherwise the price is the same 
as originally paid. Prices quoted are net. 



GENERAL PUBLICATIONS. 

Trade Price. 

A. B. C. Pathfinder Guide M . 17 

Age of Steel W.. 6 

Agriculturist . . R M . . 10 

Amateur Sportsman M . . 8 

America (Chicago) . , .- W . . 6^ 

American Analyst S . M . . 3h 

American Angler ..R W.. 4^ 

American Architect W. . l.S 

American Art Printer M. , 19 

American Bookseller S.M.. 8 

American Cricket . . R M . . 7^ 

American Cultivator W . . 4 

American Druggist •. .M. . 8 

American Economist W . . 3^ 

American P^ngineer (Chicago) W. . 6 

American Etcher M . . 50 

American Field W . . 7^ 

American Garden M . . 13 

American Gas Light Journal W . . 9 J 

American Grocer W . . 7^ 

American Jour, of Medical Science. M. . 33 
American Journal of Obstetrics. . .M. . 43 
American Jl. of Ry. Appliances . . . M . . 24 

American Journal of Science M . . 45 

American Kennel Gazette M . . 13 

American Machinist . . R W . . 4 

American Miller (Chicago) M . . 7^ 

American Musician . . R W . . 7| 

American Naturalist M. . 36 

American Poultry Journal M . . 7^ 

American Poultry Yard W . . 3^ 

American Stationer W . . 9^ 

American Stockkeeper M . . 7 

Andover Review •, M . . 30 

Anthony's Photographic Bolletin. S. M . . 12 

Architectural Era . . R M . . 14 

Arch'al and Building Monthly . .R . . M . . 36 

Arena . . R M . . 35 

Argosy (The)..R W,. 4 

Arkansaw Traveler . . R W . . 3 

Army and Navy Journal .. R W.. 12 



Army and Navy Register W . . 7 

Art de la Mode . , R M . . 25 

Art Amateur.. R M. . 28 

Art Folio (Vouga's) . ,R M . . 25 

Art Interchange S . M . . 15 

Artistic Nature (Albany). .R M.. 38 

Arthur's Home Magazine M . . 12 

Atlantic Monthly . . R 90 days M . . 28 

Author (The)..R M.. 7 

Ave Maria W . . 4J 

Architecture and Building W . . 11 

Album des Modes R . . M . . 25 

Babyhood ..R M.. 12 

Babyland M. . 3i 

Baeckerzeitung W . . 3i 

Ballou's Monthly M . . 12 

Banker's Magazine M . . 40 

Banner of Light (Spiritual) W . . 5^ 

Banner Weekly . . R W . . 5 

Bazar Dressmaker Q.. 16 

Beekeepers' Magazine M . . 4 

Belletristisches Journal W . . 7^ 

Belford's Magazine . . R M . . 18 

Blacksmith and Wheelwright M . . 7i 

Blackwood's Magazine (reprint) M . . 28 

Blade (Toledo) W. . 3 

Bon Ton.. R M.. 25 

Boys of New York.. R W.. 4 

Braithwaite's Retrospect S.A.I. 10 

Brauer Zeitung (German) W . . 3^ 

Breeders' Gazette (Chicago) W . . 6^ 

British American W . . 3^ 

British-American Citizen W. . 3^ 

Book Buyer M . . 7i 

Brooklyn Examiner W . . 4 

Builder and Decorator M . . 15 

Builder and Woodworker M . . 7^ 

Building W. . 10 

Business Women's Journal B . M . . 14 

Cabinet Maker W. . 8 

Call (Philadelphia). .R W. . 2^ 

Carpentry and Building ..R M.. 7 

Carpenter and Joiner M . . 7 

Carriage Monthly M . . 23 

Cassell's Magazine ( Amer. ed. ) . R . . M . . 11 

Catholic American W . . 2 

Catholic Home W . . 3i 

Catholic Mirror (Baltimore) W . . 4 

Catholic News (New York) W . . 2 

Catholic Quarterly Review Q.1.00 

Catholic Review W , . 5 

Catholic Standard W . . 5 

Catholic World M. . 30 

Centre Table W.. 3i 

Century ..R M.. 28 

Chatterbox M . . 7 

Chicago Law Times Q . . 35 

Chicago Ledger W. . 3 

China Decorator M . . 22 

Christian Advocate W . . 6 

Christian at Work W . . 7i 

Christian Herald ..R W.. 3 

Christian Register W . . 5 

Christian Union W . . 6 

Christian Weekly (Ulustrated) W.. 4i 

Church Magazine M . . 19 

Churchman W.. 8 

Church Press W.. 3 

Citizen (Chicago) W . . 4 

Clipper (N. Y.) W . . 7i 



2l8 



The; Newsdeai^er. 



Congregationalist , W . 

Contemporary Review (reprint) . . . M . 

Cosmopolitan . . R M . 

Cottage Hearth (Boston) M . 

•Country Gentlemen W . 

Conrrier des Etats Unis (N. Y,). . . W. 

Couturiere, La. .R M. 

Critic (Literary criticism) W . 

Current Literature . . R M . 

Chaperone R . . M . 

Catholic Herald W. 

Danbury News W , 

Decorator and Furnisher M . 

Delineator (Butterick's) M . 

Demorest Fashion Journal M. 

Demorest's Magazine . . R M . 

Demorest's Portfolio 8 . A . 

Deutsch-Amerikanische Dichtung. . M . 

Dispatch (N. Y.) W. 

Doll's Dressmaker M . 

Domestic Monthly M . 

Donahoe's Magazine . . R M . 

Dorcas Magazine M . 

Drake's Magazine . . R M . 

Dramatic News (N. Y.). .R W. 

Dramatic Times . . R W . 

Dramatic Mirror . . R W . 

Dramatic Mirror Quarterly . . R Q . 

Dress Maker Zeitung (N. Y. ) . . R . . S . M 

Druggist's Circular M . 

Dublin Freeman (N. Y, edition) R.W. 

Echoes of the Week. .R W. 

Eclectic Magazine M . 

Economist W . 

Edinburgh Review (reprint) Q. 1 

Education M . 

Educator (BuflFalo) M. 

Educational Review M . 

Electrical Age..R W . 

Electrical Engineer . . R W . 

Electrical Review .R W. 

Electrical World . .R W. 

Electric Power.. R M. 

Engineer. .R S.M. 

Engineering & Building Record .R.W. 
Engineering and Mining Journal . . . W . 

Engineering News . . R W . 

Engraver and Printer . . R M . 

Enquirer (Cincinnati) W . 

Epoch. R W. 

Epitome of Practical Medicine M. 

Evangelist W . 

Examiner and Chronicle W. 

Export and Finance W . 

Familien Blatter (N. Y. ) S.M. 

Family Story Paper (N. Y.). .R. . . W. 

Far and Near (30 days) . . R M . 

Farm-Poultry . . R M . 

Fashion Bazar (Munro's) . . R M . 

Fashion and Fancy . . R M . 

Fashion Monitor M . 

Financial and Mining Record.. R. .W. 

Fire and Water W . 

Fireside Companion W . 

Fireside Monthly. .R M. 

Folio (Musical) M . 

Forest and Steam . . R W . 

Fortnightly Review (reprint) M . 

Forum (The). .R 90 days M. 

Fox's Weekly. .R W. 



33 
19 
11 

5 

9 
22 

20 

19 

3 

2i 
26 
10 

4 
15 
16 

8 

4 

7 
IH 

15 

n 
n 

17 
14 

^ 

34 
10 
,12 
25 

H 

28 

7 

n 

7 

7i 
14 

?^ 

n 

8 

15 

5 

n 

17 

7 
5i 

7 

7 

5 

7h 

3h 
19 
22 

4 

7^ 

6i 

5 
19 

7 

n 

33 

38 

7i 



Frangais (Le) M . 

Frank Leslie's Budget M . 

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Paper. . . W . 
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Zeitung. W. 
Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours . R . . M 
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly . . . M 

Freeman's Journal W . 

Freethinkers' Magazine M . 

Free Press (Detroit). .R W. 

Freiheit (Die) S W. 

Freund's Music and Drama . . R W . 

Fur, P'in and Feather M . 

Golden Weekly . .R W. 

Goldthwaite's Geograph'lMag. .R..M. 

Garden and Forest W . 

Globe (The) W. 

Globe (Phila.). .R M. 

Globe- Democrat (St. Louis) W. 

Godey's Lady's Book . . R M . 

Golden Days for Boys and Girls. R.W. 

Golden Days (monthly parts) M. 

Golden Hours.. R W. 

Golden Weekly. .R W. 

Good Health (Battle Creek) M . 

Good Housekeeping . R . . 90 days . . M . 

Good News.. R W. 

Graphic (Chicago) W 

Great Divide (The) (Denver) M . 

Geyer'fl Stationer S. M . 

Hall's Journal of Health M . 

Harper's Bazaar W . 

Harper's Magazine M . 

Harper's Weekly W . 

Harper's Young People W . 

Harvard Lampoon S. M . 

Hausdokter M. 

Herald (N. Y.) W. 

Herald of Health M. 

Hessen Darmstaedter Zeitung. . , , W . 

Holiday. ..Juvenile.. W. 

Home and Country M . 

Home Journal W . 

Home Knowledge M . 

Home Magazine .... M . 

Home Maker (The).. R M. 

Horse and Stable W . 

Horseman W . 

Horse World (Bufifalo) W . 

Household (The) . . R M . 

Household Companion M . 

Household Monthly M . 

Housewife . . R M . 

Hub M. 

Humorist (St. Louis) W . 

Hungaria W . 

Illustrated American . .R . . 60 days . . W . 

Illustrated Catholic American W . 

lUus. Monthly Fashion Report. . ..M. 

Illustrated News (N. Y.). .R W. 

Illustrated News of the World W 

Independent W . 

Ingall's Home Magazine . . R M . 

Inland Printer , M . 

International Chess Magazine M . 

Inter-Ocean (Chicago) W . 

Investigator (Boston, Infidel) W. 

Irish American W . 

Irish Pennsylvanian . . R W . 

Irish World.. R W. 

Iron Age W . 



The Newsdealer. 



219 



Jenness Miller Mag. ." Dress ". . ..M. 

Jester (Philadelphia) W . 

Jeweler's Circular W . 

Jewish Messenger W . 

Journalist . . R W . 

Journal des Modes. .R M. 

J ournal of Progress M . 

Journal of the Telegraph M . 

Judge W. 

Kate Field's Washington W. 

Kentucky Stock Farm W. 

Kunkel's Musical Review M . 

Ladies' Home Journal (Phila.). .R. M. 

Ladies' Monthly Review M . 

Lady's Bazar. .R M. 

Ledger (New York) W . 

Leflfel's Mechanical News S. M . 

Life (Comic) W . 

Life's Calender . . R M . 

Lippincott 8 Magazine . . R M . 

Literary Digest (N. Y.) W. 

Literary News M . 

Literary World S . M . 

Living Age W . 

Locomotive Engineer. . R M . 

La Mode de Paris R . . M . 

La Mode R..M. 

L'Art de la Mode R..M. 



Magazme of American History. . . .M. 

Magazine of Art . . R M . 

Magazine of Poetry Q . 

Manufacturer and Builder . . R M . 

Manufacturer's Gazette W. 

Mechanics M . 

Medical .Journal (New York) W. 

Medical Analectic W . 

Medical and Surgical Reporter. . . . W . 

Medical Record W . 

Medical Times (Phila.) S. M. 

Merchant Traveler W . 

Mercury (New York) W , 

Metal Worker W . 

Metropolis (The) W. 

Metropolitan Fashions S . A . 

Milliners' Guide Q . 

Missouri Republic W. 

Monist, Chicago Q . 

Mother's Assistant M . 

MuDsey's Weekly . . R W . 

Musical Monthly M . 

Musical World M . 

Nachrichten aus Deutschland W. 

Nation W . 

Nationalist (Boston) M . 

National Builder M . 

National Car and Locomotive B'ld'r. M . 

National Democrat W . 

National Live Stock Journal M. 

Nature's Realm . . R M . 

New England Magazine . . R M . 

New England er and Yale Review . . M . 

New Nation (Bellamy's) . . R W . 

Newsdealer S M . 

Nineteenth Century (Reprint) M . 

No Name Magazine (Baltimore) . .R. ..M 6^ 
North American Review . . R 90 d . . M . . 38 
Northwestern Railroad Weekly . . . W . . 7 



20 

8 
9 

32 
16 

H 

6 
20 

7 

19 
4 
H 

n 

18 
18 

8 

7i 

8 
16 

7i 
25 
10 
25 

40 
28 
36 
12 

3 
17 

H 

10 

9 

9i 

6 

4i 

4 

6i 
20 
25 

H 
34 
3 

n 
10 

7 

7i 
15 
16 
14 

3 
22 
16 
18 
30 

4^ 

7 
33 



Observer (New .York) W. . 8 

Office M.. 7 

Official Inter-State Railway Guide M . . 10 

Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter W . . 9 

OnceaWeek..R W.. 7 

Open Court W. . 4 

Onr Little Men and Women M . . 7 

Our Little Ones M . . 10 

Outing.. R M.. 19 

Painters' Magazine M . . 13 

Pansy M. . 7 

Pattern Illustrator 8. A. . . 20 

Peck's Sun W . . 3 

Peterson's Magazine. ,R M. . 14 

Pharmaceutische Rundschau M . . 15 

Philadelphia Weekly Times W . . 2i 

Philatelic Journal M . . 4 

Phonetic Educator M. . 9 

Phonographic Machine M.. 13 

Phonographic World . . R M . . 7i 

Photographic Times W . . 8 

Phrenological Journal M.. 13 

Pilot W.. 4 

Police Gazette (111., Fox's) B, W . . 7 J 

Police News (111.) W. . 7i 

Political Science . . R Q . . 57 

Popular Science Monthly.R.60 days. M . . 35 

Popular Science News M . . 7i 

Popular Recitations Q . . 7 

Poultry Bulletin M. . 7 

Poultry Monthly M. . 8 

Poultry World M. . 11 

Power and Steam. .R M. . 7i 

Practical Electricity M . . 7i 

Prairie Farmer (Chicago) W . . 4 

Presbyterian Review Q. . 70 

Public Opinion.. R 5 W.. 7 

Publishers' Weekly W. . 7i 

Puck (English or German) W, . 7i 

Quarterly Review (reprint) Q . 1 . 12 

Quiver (American edition). ..R....M.. 11 

Railroad and Engineering Journal . M . . 19 

Railroad Gazette W. . 8 

Railway Age W. . 8 

Railway News W . . 7 

Rand and McNally's R. R. Guide. . M . 19 

Real Estate News (Buffalo) M . . 7 

Red Cross M . . 38 

Religo-Philosophical Journal W . . 4 

Republic W. . 4 

Republic Magazine ..R M.. 16 

Revue de la Mode.. R 25 % only.. M.. 25 

Revue Frangaise M . . 30 

Ridley's Fashion Magazine Q.. 11 

Ridley's Millinery Designer Q... 19 

Rocky Mountain Celt W. . 3 

Rocky Mountain Mining Review. . W. . 3i 

Romance. ..R M.. 15 

Rural New Yorker W. . 4 

Sail and Paddle M. . 7i 

Samedi, Le . . R W . . 3i 

Sanitarian M . . 30 

Saturday Evening Post W . . 4 

Saturday Night.. R W.. 5 

Saturday Review (N. Y.)..R W.. 7 

Schwaebisches Wochenblatt W . . 4 

Science. .R W. . 7i 



220 



The Newsdealer. 



Scientific American W . 

Scientific American, Architects' ) f^ 

and Builders' Edition \ ^ ' 

Scientific American Supplement.. .W. 

Scottish- American Journal W. 

Scottish Review Q . 1 

Scribner's Magazine. .R. 90 days. .M. 

Sentinel (Cleveland) W. 

Shakesperiana Q . 

Shoe and Leather Reportf r W . 

Shoppell's Modern Houses. .R Q. 

Short Stories . . R M . 

Spanish Am. Trade Journal. .R. . .M. 
Spirit of the South (Sn. Sii.rting). . W. 
Spirit of the Times (New York) . . . W. 

Spirit of the Turf W. 

Sporting Life (Phila. ) . . R W . 

Sporting News (St. Loni>). .R W. 

Sporting Review (Cbicagn) M. 

Sporting; Times (New York). .R. . .W, 

Sporting World. . R D. 

Sports Afield ( Denver) . . I! M . 

Sportsman (New York). .R W. 

Staats Zeitung (New York) W . 

Standard W 

Standard Recitations Q . 

St. Nicholas.. R M. 

Sun and Shade M. 

Sun (New York) W. 

Sunday Mercury (New York) W . 

Tablet (New York) W. 

Table Talk M, 

Teacher (The) M . 

Techniker S. M . 

Texas Siftings. .R W. 

Theatre (The) . . R W . 

Ticket Agent & Traveler's Guide. .M. 

Time Table W. 

Times (Chicago) W. 

Times (New York) W. 

Tobacco Journal W . 

Tobacco Leaf W. 

Toilettes . . Fashions . . R M . 

Town Topics. .R 5 30 days W. 

Traveler's Official R. R. Guide M. 

Treasure Trove M . 

Tribune (New York) VV. 

True Flag W. 

Truth (Society). .R W. 

Truth Seeker (Infidel) W. 

Turf, Field and Farm. .R W. 

Twentieth Century W. 

Union (German) W . 

Universal Magazine (Fashions) M . 

United Service Magazine M . 

University W . 

University Magazine M . 

Vick's Illustrated Magazine M . 

Voice (Musical) M . 

Voice (The) (Prohibition) W . 

Wallace's Monthly M. 

Waverly Magazine W . 

Weekly (New Y^ork) W. 

Wehman's Songs Q . 

Week's Sport.. R W. 

Western Architect (Denver). .R. ..M. 
Western Electrician W . 



6 

17 

8 

5i 
12 
19 

.3 

47 

n 

35 

15 

7 

11 

n 

7 
3 
7 
H 

4 
13 

n 

4 
,.6 

7 
20 
33 

3 



4 

7 

n 

6i 

7 

6i 
11 

7 

3i 

3 

9 

8 
10 

eh 

35 

7 

3 

5 

7 

6 

7i 

3i 

31 
8 
29 
7i 
15 

9 
17 

2i 

25 

n 

5 
5 

7 

19 
6 



Western Journalist (Chicago) M . . 72 

Western Machinist M . . 3 

Wide Awake Magazine M . . 15 

Wilson's Photographic Magazine. S. M . . 25 

Wissenschaftliche Monatsblaetter. .M , . 8 

Witness (New York) W. . 2 

Woman and Home ..R M.. 6 

Woman's Illustrated World W . 3^ 

Woman's Journal W . . 5 

Word and Works (St. Louis) M . . 3^ 

Workmen's Advocate W . . 2^ 

World (New York) W.. 3 

Writer ..R M.. 7 

Youth's Companion W . . 4 

ZephcR S. A... IS 



Libraries. 

Trade Price. Retail 
American Series W . 1 1 . . 25 

Beadle's Half-Dime Library. . R . W . . 3 . . 5 

Beadle's Dime Library . . R W . . 7 . . 10 

Beadle's Pocket Library ..R...W..3.. 5 

Boys' Home Library. . R Q. 16. . 25 

Boys' Star Library.. R W..3.. 5 

Detective Library. .R W. .6. . 10 

Deutsche Library . . R uncut ....M..7.. 10 

Family Library.. R M.IO.. 15 

Family Library.. R Q.16.. 25 

Franklin Square Library . . M . 30 per cent, off 

Globe Library B. W.15.. 25 

Globe Detective Series B.M . 15 . . 25 

Hand-Book Library. .R M.15.. 25 

Humboldt Library S. M . 10^ . 15 

Judge's Library.. R M..7.. 10 

Ledger Library. . R S. M.30. . 50 

Libr. of American Authors . . R . M . 15 . . 25 

Library of Choice Fiction M . 30 . . 50 

Lippincott's Select Novels M . 33 J . 50 

Little Chief Library. R W..3.. 5 

Log Cabin Library.. R W..7.. 10 

Lovell's Am. Authors Series . . S . M . 30 . . 50 

" Foreign Lit. " ....M.30.. 50 

" International " W.30.. 50 

" Occult " ....M.30.. 50 

* '• Westminster " R. W.17.. 25 

* " Detective " R..M.14.. 25 

* " Am. Novelists' " R..W.14.. 25 

* '* Leather Clad Tales.R..W. 14.. 25 

■^ 10., 15 

I 14 20 

* Literature Series . . R W ! , - ' ' nx, 

* Pol. and Sci. •• ..R ^*|20.!30 

J 24!! 35 

*Copie8 of all above " Series " sent out on standiu? 
orders will be untrimmed. Such copies will be al- 
ways retuxnable. Back nnmbera will be trimmed 
and will not be returnable. 

Madison Square Series M.15.. 25 

Manual Library, S. & S. . .R . . S.M . .7 . . 10 

Nickel Library. .R W. .3. . 6 

Nelson's Star Library . . R M 14 . . 25 

Nugget Library. .R W. .3. . 5 



The NEWSDEAI.ER. 



221 



Old Cap Collier Lib. ..1 to 330. .R. .3. . 5 
Old Cap Collier " S.M.33I up.R. .7. . 10 
Old Sleuth Library.. R Q..7.. 10 

Pastime Series M.15..25 

Pinkerton Detective Series M.15..25 

Primrose Series. . .S. &S..R.. S.M. 30. . 50 

Popular Series ..R S.M. 15.. 25 

Puck's Library.. R M..7.. 10 

Red Letter Series, Lovell's . . R . W . . 8 . . 25 

Rialto Series M.30. . 50 

Riverside Paper Series M . 33 J . 50 

Sea and Shore Series . . R M . 15 . . 25 

Seaside Library Quarto 30 per cent, off 

tSeaside Library, Pocket.R D. " 

tSeaside Library, 25c ed . . R. . . W . 14 . 25 

tUutrimmed copies of the Pocket Seaside above 
1274 and 25c Edition above 369 onbi are returnable. 
Previous issues are all trimmed and not returnable. 
Other issues will be supplied only trimmed and non- 
returnable, after regular orders are filled. 

Secret Service Series. .R M.15. . 25 

Select Dialogues.. R S.M..7.. 10 

SelectSer. (Street & Smith)R. 8. M.15 . 25 

Select Speakers.. R S.M..7.. 10 

Tn.&CountryLib.Appleton'8.S.M.33i. 50 

Wide Awake Library. .R W. .3. . 5 

World Library ,R Q. . | on' ' kq 



Imported English and French 
Periodicals. 



six Weeks' Notice Required to Add or Discon- 
tinue any of the Imported Periodicals, except 
those marked with *, on which orders to add or 
decrease will take effect as promptly as on Ameri- 
can publications. 

Trade Price. 

Academy W. . 9 

All the Year Round M. . 30 

Architect W. . 14 

Art Journal M . . 38 

Atheneum W. . 9 

Bailey's Magazine of Sports M . . 33 

Band of Hope Review M . . 3 

Belgravia M . . 35 

Black and White W.. 19 

Bow Bells M.. 18 

Boys of England M . . 20 

Boys of the Empire M . . 18 

British Workman M . . 4 

Builder W.. 14 

Building News W. . 14 

Chamber's Journal M . . 15 

Chemical News W. . 12 

Children's Friend M . . 4 

Child's Companion M . . 4 

Christian Million M . . 18 

Commonweal W . . 4^ 

Court Journal (London) W. . 18 

Cornhill Magazine M. . 20 

Dispatch W . . 5 

Dublin Nation W. . 10 



Economist W. . 24 

Edinburgh Scotchman W. . 8 

Electrical Review W . . 12 

Electrician W. . 12 

Engineer W . . 20 

Engineering W . . 20 

Euglish Historical Review Q. 1 . 12 

English Illustrated Magazine M . . II 

English Mechanic W . . 8 

Era W.. 18 

Family Herald W. . 5 

Family Herald (part) M . . 20 

Field W., 22 

Figaro lUustr^ M . . 61 

Fun W.. 5 

(harden W . . 12 

Gentleman's Magazine M . . 35 

Gentlewoman, The W.. 18 

Glasgow Herald W . . 8 

Good Words M . . 18 

Graphic W . . 20 

Home Chimes M . . 12 

Household Words M . . 18 

Illustrated London News W . . 20 

Illustrated Naval and Military Mag. M . . 60 

111. Sporting and Dramatic News . . W . . 20 

Infants' Magazine M . . 3^ 

Irish Catholic W . . 3| 

Irish Society W. . 3i 

Journal des Modes M . . 45 

Journal of Fabrics M . . 27 

Judy W.. 7 

Knowledge M . . 20 

• Labour World. Michael Davitt's . . W . . 3 

Ladder. . R M . . 15 

Lady's Magazine M . . 35 

Lancet W.. 17 

Leisure Hour M. . 18 

Little Folks M.. 18^ 

Little Gleaner M.. 3 

Little One's Own W. . 3i 

Liverpool Mercury W . . 7i 

Lloyd's Newspaper W . . 5 

London Jonrnal W . . 5 

London Journal (part) M . . 24 

London Novelette M.. 18 

London Reader. W . . 4^ 

London Society M . . 35 

"Longman's Magazine M.. 15 

*Macmil]an's Magazine M . . 30 

Marine Engineer M.. 19 

Mark Lane Express W , , 9 

Mechanical Progress M.. 11 

Mode Ulustrfe M. . 75 

Murray's Magazine M . . 2S 

Myra's Journal of Fashions . . R . . . . M . . 15 

Nation (Dublin).. R. W.. 4 

Nature W. . 15 

New Review M . . 19 

Pall Mall Budget W. . 17 

•Princess Novelette . . R M . . 14 

Printing Times and Lithographer. .M. . 15 

Public Health M . . 17 

Public Opinion W . , 8 

Publishers' Circular W . . 7 

Punch W.. 9 



222 



The Newsdealer. 



Queen W.. 20 

♦Rare Bits.. R VV.. 5 , 

•Review of Reviews . . R, 30 days strict 

M.. 15 

Revue Illustree S.M. . 28 

Reynold's Newspaper W . . 5 

Saturday Review.. W. . 18 

Science Gossip M . . 12 

♦Season M.. 24 

Shamrock (Dublin) W.. 4^ 

Sheep Breeder & Wool Reporter, Glas- 
gow M. . 7 

•Something to Read..R M. . 19 

Speaker W. . 17 

Spectator W . 18 

Sporting Life S.W. . 4^ 

•Strand Magazine. R M. . 16 

Sunday at Home M.. 11 

Sunday Magazine M . . 88 

Temple Bar M . . 35 

Theater M . . 33 

The Times (weekly edition) W . . 8 

Tinsley's Magazine M . . 20 

Truth W.. 18 

Universal Instructor M . . 20 

Weekly Times and Echo W . . 5 

•Westminster Review M . . 32 

World M.. 18 

World of Fashion M. . 35 

•Young Ladies' Journal M . . 25 



Imported German Periodicals. 

First number gratis of those marked f- First 
and second numlter gratis of those marked *. 
is- All the numbers for the year must be taken to 
obtain free copies. 

WEEKLY. 

Trade Price. 

tDeutsche Gartenlaube 3J 

■j-Familien Freund 3 

tFliegende Blaster. .R 6^ 

tLeipziger Gartenlaube 4 

SEMI-MONTHLY. 

Trade Price, 
t Aus Fremden Zungen . . R . . S . M . . 12 . . 12 

AUgemeine lUustrirte Zeitung 10 

tBnch fiir AUe 9 

tChronik der Zeit 7 

tlUustrirte Frauen Zeitung 12 

lUustrirte Romane aller Nationen 6 

tlllustrirte Welt 8^^ 

+Kinder- Gartenlaube 3| 

+KunstfurAUe 7 

•Leipziger Gartenlaube . . R 7 

tMarlitt's Romane 11 

+Modenwelt 7 

tNeues Blatt 7 

tRomanbibliothek 11 

tRomanbibliothek (salon edition) 13 

tUeber Land und Meer 13 

fUniversum 10 

Wiener Moden 10 

f Zur Guten Stunde 10 



18 IN A YEAR. 

Trade Price. 

Daheim (Part 1, 4c. ; Part 18, free) 13 

Deutscher Hausschatz 11 

tSchorer Familien Blatt 11 

MONTHLY. 

Trade Price. 

Allegemeime Haus & Reis Bibliothek.R. . 10 

Alte und Neue Welt 14 

4.Daheim 23 

Der Hausdokter 8 

Deutsche Rundschau 46 

+Gewerbehalle 35 

tHumoristisches Deutschland 12 

fKinderlaube 8 

Meisterwerke der Holzschneidekunst . . .26 
Modeme Kunst in Mei8terholzschnitten.26 
tNeue Musikzeitung (8 parts per year). .11 

+Neue Zeit 13 

Nord und Slid 43 

tSchorer's Familienblatt Salon Ausgabe. 18 

tUeber Land und Meer 22 

+Vom Fels zum Meer 21 



Coast Publications. 

San Francisco unless otherwise noted. " Coast 
Publications " ordered from any News Company- 
east of the Rocky Mountains will cost a trifle more 
than here quoted. 

Trade Price. 

Abend Post (German) W . . 4 

Alta California W. . 3 

American Standard ..R W.. 3 

Architectural News . . R M . . 25 

Argonaut W . . 6 

Argus (City). . .R W. . 6 

Breeder and Sportsman ..R W.. 6 

Building Record.. R M.. 17^ 

Bulletin W.. 2 

California Architect M. . 19 

California Illustrated World . . R . . W . . 6 

Call W^. 2 

China News W.. 7 

Chronicle W. 2^ 

Coast Review M . . 20 

Commercial Herald and Market Review 15 

Continent, The..R M.. 6 

Courier (French) W. . 8 

Dramatic Brevities ..R W.. 6 

Examiner W.. 3 

Fancier's Monthly (San Jose) . . R . . M . . 7 
Family Ledger (Stockton) . . R W . . 2% 

Freethought. .R W. . 2^ 

Journal of Industry. .R M. . 10 

Library and Studio .. R M.. 7 

Monitor (The) W. . 6 

Music and Drama. .R W. . 3 



The Newsdeai^er. 



225 



News Letter. .R W 6 

New West (Oakland) . . R ". M . ". 6 

Orchard and Farm ..R M.. 6 

Overland Monthly . . R 4 M M . . 25 

Pacific States Illustrated Weekly 7^ 

Post W.. 3 

Rural Press. .R W.. 6 

San Josean (San Jo8e)..R W. . 5 

Scientific Press.. R W.. 6 

Spirit of the Times. .R W. . 7 

Staafcs ZeituDg W . . 4 

Wave..R W. . 6 

Wasp (The).. R 30 days W., 6^ 



Miscellaneous. 

" Album of Gems," Song Books . .R. . . 3^ 

Frank Tousey's Popular Music . . R 6 

Players' Nat. League Base- Ball Guide. . 7i 

Police Gazette 25c Books J off 

Popular Dime Hand- Books. .R 7 

Reach's Base- Ball Guide 7i 

Spalding's Base-Ball Guide 7| 

Tousey's 10c Books . . R ,. "7 

Wehman's Irish Song Books 14 



ANf UlNPIlOMISING FIEI<D FOR 
CAISVASSEIt-S. 



The publisher of a weekly paper 
showed the following letter to a 
Dunsmuir News reporter : 

' ' Dear Sir — Your letter asking 
me to act as your agent and sub- 
scription solicitor has arrived. I 
thank you for the confidence you 
place in me when you say that you 
trust in me to do a big business in 
getting subscriptions, including the 
twelve-by-twenty-eight copy of ' The 
Angelus ' as a premium to every 
subscriber. From a perusal of your 
sample copy, I consider your paper 
to be a dicknailer of the first water ; 
but owing to the fact that the crops 
were a failure last year, and the 
bhzzard in January wiped out the 
cattle, and that the population in 
this place is only two families and a 
water tank, and one of the families 
is away at the hot springs, and the 
other one, which was only Jed 
Roach himself, is dead since Decem- 
ber, and as, dear sir, I am going 
East because I have no society ex- 
cept freight trains and telegraph 



messages that do not stop as they 
pass by, I do not think it would 
pay me to make much of a boom 
for your paper here, even if you in- 
creased the commission and threw 
in a three-bladed pocket-knife. 

' ' You asked me to hand your let- 
ter to some other person in my 
town, provided I cannot work for 
you myself. I have no one to hand 
it to, but I will nail it on the water 
tank when I leave. ' ' 



W. J. Morse, the publisher of 
r Art de la Mode and Reviie de la 
Mode, writes to be enrolled among 
the few publishers who refuse to al- 
low the shark subscription agencies 
to receive orders from people not di- 
rectly in the trade at less than pub- 
lishers' prices. 



BOOKS RHCHIVHD. 



" The Joys of Life.' ' By Emile Zola. 424 pages. 
Peterson's New 25-cent Series. 

" Told In the Hills." By Marah Ellis Ryan. 362 
pages. Rialto Series 33. 50 cents. 

•' Constance Winter's Choice." By Anna Louise 
Beckwlth. Globe I^ibrary 144. 25 cents. 

" Confessions of a Nun." By Sister Agatha. 337 
pages. Jordan Brothers, publishers, Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania. 50 cents. 

" The Youngest Brother." A Socialistic Ro- 
mance. By Ernst Wicbert. Illustrated. Library 
of Choice Fiction 17. 50 cents. 

"Five-Minute Declamations for School and Col- 
lege." Selected and adapted by Walter K. Forbes. 
Part Second. 240 pages. Lee & Shepard. Cloth,. 
50 cents. 



Kate field's f ashington 

— IS THE — 

Lire Literary and Political Review, 

Published in New York and Washington. De- 
voted to the interests of California and the Pacific 
Coast. 

Retail Price^ S2.0O a yr.; 5c. a copy. 

To Dealers, Sl.dO a yr.; 3c. a 

copy. Returnable for 

Four \¥eckft. 



Regular Dealers furnished with a free Sample 
Copy weekly for advertising purposes. Sample 
Copies for Distribution Furnished when Desired. 
Send in your Orders and Subscriptions. 

WASHINGTON PUBLISHING CO. 

116 East 23d »t. New York City» 



224 



The Newsdealer. 



THE ElfGI^ISH EDITION IS 
"THE SEASO]?J." 



Franz and Frieda Lipperheide, 
proprietors and editors of the fash- 
ion magazine Modenwelt, have cele- 
brated the twenty-fifth anniversary 
of the foundation of their journal, 
which is now published in twelve 
modern languages, with an issue of 
nearly half a million copies fort- 
nightly. On the first of the year 
the successful editors started a pen- 
sion fund for the benefit of their 
employees, donating $50,000 as a 
stock capital. The pensioners are 
to draw annuities ranging from 200 
to 1,500 marks, and the whole 
scheme is on a most liberal basis. 



NEIJV SIMII^E. 



' ' As mum as an oyster ' ' is now 
pointless and inexpressive. "As 
mum as The Newsman on the circu- 
lation question ' ' is later and better 
in every way. 



E. F. Games, the pushing, thriv- 
ing, enthusiastic philatelist of this 
city, lately has adopted a new 
method of advertising his coin and 
stamp business, which is quite 
novel and original. Fence adver- 
tising is his latest, and quite a num- 
ber of fences in San Francisco are 
being adorned with his famous blue 
Egyptian stamp and showy white 
letters, on a bright vermillion 
ground work. 

Near the corner of 14th and 
Howard streets, he has erected at 
no little cost, a mammoth fence 1 2 
feet high by 50 feet long, and the 
Egyptian stamp thereon is without 
doubt the largest of its kind ever 
painted on any fence in the world. 

So big is it that while riding on 
a Howard Street Cable, one can al- 
most detect the sphynx winking, 
while passing. 

Have you noticed whether you 
make more, or as much, profit on 
Sporting Times than Sporting News ? 



I AM very much afraid the Amer- 
ican Trotter, of Independence (Iowa), 
is not booming the news business 
to the extent the publishers antici- 
pated when they sent out the trade 
circular announcing that it would 
not be returnable, because the paper 
would always be completely sold out 
on every news-stand. J. H. Rey- 
nolds, of Harlan, Iowa, sends a sam- 
ple page of the journal in question, 
in which "every man, woman and 
child ' ' is asked to act as agent in 
their locality. A beautiful discount 
is allowed, and the one who sends in 
the most subscribers during the year 
will be presented with ' ' one thou- 
sand dollars in cash." "After the 
first ten subscribers you will be al- 
lowed the fifty cents for ever>' sub- 
scriber." 
Oh, the ways of the wicked are many. 

And the pubs, know tricks not a few, 
But I doubt if schemers any 

Can keep up with the Trotter crew. 
« ^ » ■ 

Ignatius Donnelly's last book, 
"Caesar's Column," is now in its 
seventeenth edition. The publish- 
ers, F. J. Schulte & Company, 
Chicago, announce that a Swedish 
translation is now in press, and that 
a German translation, also, will be 
issued this year. Special editions 
for the English and European mar- 
kets will be brought out by Samp- 
son Low, Marston, Searle & Riving- 
ton, the great London publishing 
house, who have also arranged with 
the Chicago publishers to bring out 
Mr. Donnelly's forthcoming book, 
"Dr. Huguet," simultaneously with 
its publication in America. 

« ^ » 

A VERY inferior lot of five-cent 
song books and ten-cent ' ' hand- 
books ' ' are being shoved out on 
sale, by the Benedict Popular Pub- 
lishing Company. Some of the 
hand-book covers are pretty good, 
but the insides are a sight to be- 
hold. Poor paper and poor print 
seem to rule where they come from. 
So many books of this kind are now 
being published, a dealer should 
frequently weed out the most un- 
salable ones and return. 



NEWSDEALERS 

The Arena is a Sure Seile?. 

Newsdealers rnake 15 Cents per 
copy, or 3 Cents itiore than on 
any other Jirst-class Magazine. 

GIVE THE ARENA A PROMINENT POSITION ON YOUR COUNTERS. 

IT IS THE HIT OF THE TIMES! 

Call the attention of the magazine-buying public to the ARENA. By so 
doing you will largely increase your magazine sales. 

Large Profits. Unsold Copies Returnable. No Rislts, 

BOOM IT! V/ORK IT! 

ORDER OF TnE VVIHOUS !fEWS CCItt3»ANIES. 




JUST OUT, A NOVBL OF" TO-DAY. 

H TW? Yoii7|on, Ijij LoM ? 

A Realistic Novel of To-Day, by 

HKLEN H. GARDKNER, 

Author of " A Thoughtless Ycb," " Men, Women and Gods," " Sex in Bisius," etc., etc. 
With Fnll-Pai^e Portrait of tlie Autbor, from recent Plioto$rra»li by Sarony 

This Novel Is without question the most rudical, and in many respects the boldest assault on the 
respectable conventionality and immorality in high places that has ever been written. 

AS A NOVEL,, 

It is brilliant, absorbing, and at times hig^lv dramatic. The reader's interest is held from the opening 
line to the last word of the book ; and, while crying evils and vital probl'-ms are brought before 'he 
reader in a vivid and realistic manner, there is not a stilted utterance from cover to cover ; nor dors 
the re ader's interest llag owiug to pedantic moralizing. The terrible tnilhs are so vividly pictured that 
they will, in themselves, suggest to every thoughtful mind the urgeut need of positive measures to 
elevate the standard of morals. , 

AS AN EXPOSE, 
Of the {"jastice which is meted out to woman by society, and as a revelation ol the shams and evils 
which to-day pa.«8 almost unchallenged under the cloak of respectability, this story stands unrivalled. 
It is the earnest plea of a brave and noble-hearted woman for the triumph of a higher standard of 
morality and the abolition of hypocrisy, cant, and dishonesty in thought as well as in action. 

THE HARVARD FAST SET 

Are mercilessly handled by the author, a piece of pen picturing which will anytiiing but pleaae the 
Fred Harmons of fair Harvard. 

PRICE, PAPER, 50 CENTS; CLOTH, 8I.OO. 



ARENA PUBLISHING CO., - Bcstcn, n^ass. 

Order of tbe Various Nriirs Comiianles. Liberal Discount AllowcA. 



— «• — 

12 MO.. PAPER COVERS. PRICE, 50 CENTS EACH. 

It is our purpose to make this the very choicest line of paper covered books in 
this country. An inspection of the numbers so far issued will be convincing proof 
that we have selected the masterpieces of the very best authors. We have endeav- 
ored, also, to make these the handsomest and most attractively bound books in the 
market. To this end, large, clear type has been used, and a superior quality of 
toned paper. The covers are printed on the finest enameled paper, in colors, each 
book having an appropriate design. The illustrations throughout the books are the 
product of the leading artists of the day, many of them being works of art. The 
numbers in this series are issued with either uncut or trimmed edges. 

-t- 

The LiOHt Witttpns, or The mystery •£ Lieah PageU By Lavrrenoe L. Lynch. 557 

pages ; 16 full-page illutitrations. 
JVlademolwclle do naupln. A romance of Love and Passion. By Th6opliile Gautier. With 16 

etcliiugu iVom origiual designs by Toudouze. 
A Gold IIuntcr^N Adventures, or liife In Australia. By Wm. H. Themes. 564 pages ; 

40 lull-puKe illustrations. 
Shadowed by Three. By Lawrence L. LjTich. 670 pages ; 55 full-page illustrations. 
Notro CoDur (The Human Heart]. By Guy de Maupassant. Translated from the French by 

Aloxina I.orangcr. Illustrated with 12 half-tone illustratiwis on enameled paper, including portredt 

of the Author. 
A Wlialcnianvs Adventures on Sea and Land. By Wm. H. Thomes. 444 pages ; 36 full- 
page engravings. 
Cam 1 lie. By Alexandre Dumas, fils. Illustrated with 16 beautiful photo-gravures on enameled 

pajxir. 
Pierjre et Jean (Peter and John). Bv Guy de Maupassant. Translated from the French by 

Alcsina Loranger. Illustrated with eight half-tones on enameled paper. 
madellne J»aync, The Detective's Daughter. By Lawrence L. Lynch. 456 pages; 45 

fiiU-pagc illustrations. 
The Klch IWan's Fool. By Robert C. Givins, Esq. Illustrated with 17 handsome half tone en- 
gravings ou enameled paper. This book will be extensively advertised and will create a sensation. 
A. I». tf <H>0. By Lieut. Alvarado M. FuUer, U. S. A. Illustrated with 16 half-tone engravings on 

enameled paper. Lieut. Fuller describes the conditions, customs and appearance of our country as, 

with prophetic eye, he sees they will be in the year 2000. He has woven through all a romance of 

the most absorbing Interest. 
The Bushraiis^ers. A Yankee's Adventures during a Second Trip to Australia. By Wm. H. 

Thomes. 480 pages ; 16 full-page illustrations. 
The Ciionanw. By Honorb de Balzac. Illustrated with 100 engravings on wood by Leveille, from 

drawings by Julian de Blant. Newly translated into English by George Saintsbury. 
A Chronicle of the Reign of Charles IX. Translated from the French of Prosper Merim^e 

by George Saintsbury. Illustrated with 110 engravings on wood from drawings by Toudouze. 
The Cartaret Affair. By St. George Rathbome, author of " Doctor Jack," etc. Illustrated with 

16 full-page engravings from original pen drawings by Henry Mayer. 
Such is Life (Comuie dans la vie). By Albert Delpit. Translated from the French by Alex- 

iua Lorauger. Elegantly illustrated. 
An Unconscious Crime. By Dr. N. T. Oliver, author of " The King of Gold," etc. Illustrated 

with 16 full-page engravings from original pen drawings by Henry Mayer. 
Gcrminle liUcerteux. By Edmond and' Jules Goncourt. Illustrated with 10 photo-gravures 

irom the original French etchings. 
The Youngest Brother. A Socialistic Romance. By Ernst Wichert, author of " The Green 

Gate," " The Workers," " A Brave Heart," etc. Translated from the German by " Kannida." Illus- 
trated by Henry Mayer. 
mauprat. By George Sand. Translated from the French by Henrietta E. Miller. Illustrated with 

10 naif- tones from the original etchings by Le Blant. 

^^ For sale hy all Johhers and Nemrs Companies— mailable at one cent 
per pound. 

LAIRD & LEK, PUBLISHERS, 

263 & 266 WABASH AVENUE, OHIOAOO, ILL. 



i 



4